The Open State of Politics

The Open State of Politics


…to leave the European Union, you all laughed at me. Well, I have to say you’re not laughing now, are you? [eery background noise] [calm music] When we look at our political systems we see systems that are driven by egos, infected by violent language. That are very disconnected from us the citizens, and there’s a lot of us out there working every day to change the political system. Fighting all the time and it takes up a lot of energy. We feel that change is very slow to bring about. Actually it might seem like we don’t change anything at all. And it’s really hard to keep the fire burning and some of us burn out. I arrived here last night and I was super My God I was just very tired, I came here with a very sensible state of mind because when I’m tired I’m like so vulnerable and easy to scare. I arrived and I got this vibe, like walking in my pajamas into the breakfast room, not knowing anyone, and it felt like, “Oh, it’s like a family feeling.” Just the fact that everybody wears socks and ate together. It made me feel very welcome, and very like, “Oh, that’s natural state.” In the fall of 2017 20+ democracy shapers came together for the first time. They came from all over Europe, and they shared life together for five days, working together, cooking together, being humans together. And went through a deep process of connecting with themselves, connecting with each other, that they finally found that part within themselves again that gave them strength. They finally were able to admit how hard it is. I think during the Open State of Politics we were able to create an environment where everyone was hopefully able to let go a little bit of this armor that protects us. Because there was nothing to be afraid of. Everyone there was in good will of each other. [music] There were moments like almost magic moments where you really felt that the people are all on the same track. Are all following the same path, the same pattern I would say despite their diversity and despite where they came from. You really can feel the unity here between all the people it’s amazing. Over these four days you created us a little anti-authoritarian communist state in which we’ve lived, and we’ve learned things and made friends and make connections and experience a lot of humanity we’ve eaten and slept, and explored and learned things and done a little work and had a lot of fun. I think we’ve all left with a strong sense of human connection and possibility and renewed vigor for what we want to do. In our transformation camps we work with many different methodologies. We bring together a mix from agile development but also we work with tools of mindfulness and empathy. We, for example, use approaches from the Theory U. [music] When we leave this place and go back to our everyday lives, it will remind us how disappointing they are and how much trauma and pain is involved in just living day to day. That’s for us the kind of people who are so privileged so we can go and spend five days living in the woods. In many ways, the meaning of activism for us is to try and bring this life that we have reimagined here back to the world that we will return to. [music]

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