The Business Society: Transferability Requirements to Baruch and Queens College

The Business Society: Transferability Requirements to Baruch and Queens College


– Wow, what a fantastic turnout. I’m glad you’re all here. I’m delighted you were able to
make it despite the weather. Those of you who don’t know me, my name is Professor Kasomenakis, I teach in the Business
Department at Queensborough, and I’m also the Faculty Coordinator of the Business Society. So, it’s just great to see so many people that have such an ambition to learn about the
transferability requirements to Baruch and Queens College. It shows me tremendous
motivation on your part to continue your education
beyond Queensborough. So, my congratulations to you. So, you have come to the
right place at the right time to get all that information that you need. So let’s get started with
the meeting right away because it’s chock full of information, and I first want to
introduce you to our speakers that are going to be giving
you the valuable information. We have Professor Villani
from the Business Department. (audience applauds) Let’s give a nice round hand of applause. Natalie, my apology if I
mispronounce your last name, Roopchand, who is the Freshman Coordinator from the Business Academy. (audience applauds) Mr. Brian Kerr, Director,
Office of Academic Affairs. (audience applauds) Mr. Andre Coombs, Academic Advisor. (audience applauds) And Mr. George Muchita.
– That’s right. – Who is.
(audience applauds) The Four Year College
Transfer Coordinator. And I also have two guests from Hofstra, and we have Miss Bales,
who is the Assistant Dean of the Frank Zarb School
(audience applauds) of Business at Hofstra. And Eryn Hornung, hope
I pronounced that too, if I didn’t my apologies,
(audience applauds) who is the Assistant
Director of Admissions at Hofstra University. So let me turn over the mic
now to professor Villani. And here she is. – Okay, can you hear me this one or no? – [Man] Yes. – Maybe this one’s better. Okay, welcome, it’s a great turn out, we’re happy to see all of you, especially in light of the weather today. Let me know if you can’t hear me. I tend to fade down a little bit. We have many things to
share with you today. The announcement mentioned
about transferring and we’re certainly
going to speak on that, but we’re also gonna speak a little bit about what you’re doing
here at Queensborough, because we believe if you’re
successful at Queensborough, that will enhance you and you
move on to the next college. So we will go over some tips
along those lines as well. Before we get started, our
Hofstra representatives are passing around clipboards. I guess if you’re interested in Hofstra, fill out your name and
contact information. So that’s going around in the meanwhile. Okay, everyone’s introduced. Okay first thing we wanna mention, here you are at the community college and it’s, we wanna make
sure everyone understands, we’re a community college, part of CUNY. CUNY has 23 institutions in total, consisting of several senior colleges and several junior colleges. The community college is a junior college. Typically at the junior college level, you’ll look to achieve 60 credits, usually around 60 credits, you might go a few over, and that leads to an associate degree. Sometimes referred to
as a two-year college, because if you do 60
credits in four semesters, that would be 15 credits each semester, so that’s where the two years come from. But most people don’t
accomplish it in two-years, so if you take more than two years, there’s no harm in that and
certainly no shame in it. Okay, then you would look to move on to your senior college level, which is typically 120 credits, it could exceed that again, and then you would earn
your bachelor’s degree. Okay, and that’s sometimes referred to as the four-year college. Okay, here at Queensborough
we offer an associate degree. You need to complete all
the courses in your program. You need to have 2.0 average and you need to have two
writing intensive courses, which will be referred to later on. In all cases you receive
an associates degree. The different degrees are the
AA, the Associate of Arts, the AS, the Associate in Science, and the AAS, Associate in Applied Science. So it’s three type of degrees, but they’re all associate degrees, which means you’ve earned the degree from a community college. The difference between them is how many liberal arts
and science courses are. So for instance, the AAS, we
only have 1/3 liberal arts, the majority are whatever the program is. So if in your Accounting
you’ll have 2/3 would be in the Accounting Program. So it’s all a matter of liberal arts is the difference in
the three degrees, okay? So what do you wanna achieve here? If you’re interested in transferring, your goal is to take 60
credits at Queensborough, earn your associate degree, and then transfer to the senior college. And then hopefully you’ll
just take 60 more credits and then you’ll earn
your bachelor’s degree. So what you want to look
at, is how to plan properly so that you can do this efficiently. You don’t wanna take 60 credits here that aren’t going to be worth anything when you go to the senior college and then have to take a full 120. You wanna plan ahead
so that the 60 credits you’re taking here apply
to whatever program you’re going to pursue when you move on to the senior college. All right, so it’s all in the planning, and we want you to start planning now. And we suggest you don’t
just go semester by semester. What you should be doing
is a long range plan, two long range plans. One here at the community college, what you would wanna take each semester to accomplish your associates degree here. And then thinking also where
you intend to transfer to and have a long range plan for there also. And you want to do this because the more efficient you are, the quicker you will accomplish your goal. You will not waste taking courses that might not be necessary. Okay, so here at Queensborough
in the Business Department we offer these programs you can see here, the Business Administration,
the Accounting, Computer Information Systems, Management, and the Office Administration
and Technology. The codings next to those are how they’re coded on any records that you obtain from the college. The Business Administration
will give you the AA degree, AS, excuse me, AS degree. All the others are AAS. Again, it’s all a matter of the number of liberal arts courses you take. Okay, so first you wanna know what you’re doin’ here at Queensborough, and we have a lotta help
here to help you with it. Okay, all of us that are sitting here on this panel advise students, so we’re familiar with
all of the requirements. Okay, and then second you
wanna familiarize yourself with the requirements for the college that you intend to transfer to. Because again, you want to make sure you take courses here that
are going to be a smooth slide over to the senior colleges. Okay, what’s very important,
number three here, is some courses transfer
course for course, some courses transfer as elective credit. Now there’s no harm in
having elective credit. However, you wanna keep your
elective credits smaller and your course for course bigger, because in the long run,
that’s gonna help you and save you time when you
transfer to the senior colleges. And we’re gonna give you
some information on that. So what we suggest is you do
a semester by semester plan. Now there’s checklists by, I wanna get outta this
window for a minute here. Oh, let me see where it is, yeah. And I’ll start with this one. Okay, we have a lot of things to help you. It’s actually on the next
slide, I’ll mention it now. You should look at the college catalogs from each of the colleges. Certainly be familiar
with Queensborough’s, and then whatever college
you intend to transfer to. It’s very convenient these days, because so much is on the websites. So go to the college websites, they have tons of
information available to you. In each of our departments, I’m in the Business Department, Miss Roopchand’s in the Freshman Academy, I’m sure most of you have met her if you started here the last year or two. Mr. Muchita is in the
Administration Building, he’s our 4-year transfer counselor and then Mr. Kerr and Mr. Coombs are in the Academic Advisement Center. And in every one of those areas we have different information for you and checklists to help you out. But what I have here I
share with my students so I’m sharing it with you today, and I hope to have this
in ePortfolio shortly so any of you can access it. But what I’ve done here is two templates. One is the Business
Administration Program. So it lists all of the required courses and it notes the
prerequisites and the credits. And what I suggest you
do is print this out, it’s prepared in Excel but you don’t have to do it in Excel. If you want to, the arithmetic will be done automatically for you. But you don’t need to do it in Excel. And plan each semester what
courses you’ve already taken, if you’ve been in college for a while and what you plan to take every semester including the summer, including
the January mini-session if you intend to go, so that
you have a long-range plan. And when you expect to earn your degree here at Queensborough. And the reason I suggest this is because I advise a lot of students and I cannot tell you the number of times a student’s ready to graduate
and is missing one course. And maybe that course BU-203, and the problem is they didn’t know there were prerequisites on BU-203, and now all of a sudden they
think they’re graduating in May and they have to go to summer school. Very common, very common. So if you plan ahead long range, then you know what the prerequisites are, you take the courses in the proper order, and you should achieve your graduation when you want to. Now there’s also no harm
if you have to change it. Things happen, circumstances come up. So if you need to drop a
course or make a change, or you decide you don’t
like the program you’re in and you wanna switch, absolutely do it. But always do it with a plan. Okay, so I actually have
two of these available for the Business Accounting Program because I am an Accounting professor here and also for the Business
Administration Program. Not only if you decide to use this, use it for here at Queensborough, but then use the same idea when you transfer to the senior colleges. Make a plan, find out the requirements, look at what you wanna do each semester and have your goal what you expect to accomplish at graduation. It’s a great tool. And I’ll tell you as an aside, I’ve done this with my children. Two of my children graduated
from college already and I made sure, ’cause
I was paying their bills, I made sure they got out very efficiently without having to spend
a lot of extra tuition, and the third one’s just about
ready to graduate as well. So this works well and
I’ve used it for students and I’ve used it for my own family. Okay, I hope to have that on ePortfolio and as soon as we do, Vicky
will get that information. Professor Kasomenakis
will get that out to you. Okay, and this I already said, we have many tools available
to you to help you. Ultimately you’re responsible. It’s your degree, it’s your time, it’s your money. So we can advise you best we can and guide you and make suggestions based on our experience
with so many students, but ultimately it’s up to you to find out the information and work towards earning your degree. Okay, I think Mr. Brian
Kerr will come up now. You can flip the slides or you want help? – No, I can do it.
– Okay. – Hello everyone, nice to
see you, good afternoon. I am very impressed at the turnout. I wanna make sure I
don’t spend a lot of time speaking at you because I hope you’ll ask a lot of questions. My name is Brian Kerr, I’m
from Academic Advisement and I think the last time I did one of these presentations was about five years ago. So I’m dating myself now
but it’s so nice to see and I’m glad we moved to a bigger venue because I think we had about 50 students and we were crammed in
this very small space. Also happy to be here with my colleagues and our colleagues from
Hofstra University. I’m gonna talk quickly just about the Business Administration Program. Professor Villani talked
about it being an AS degree. You see 31 to 36 1/2 credits
in liberal arts and science. It says includes foreign language. If you’re doing BT1 you don’t
always need foreign language. If you have three units, or three, I should say three or
more high school units of a foreign language, you’re exempt. Many times students coming
from high school do not, so as a result they have
to take foreign language. Most four-year schools, I come from, in another life I worked
at Stony Brook University, most of the SUNY and
most four-year schools do require a year of foreign language. So I often tell my students it’s not a bad thing to have. So don’t worry about
having to take language. 23 credits of business
courses are in the curriculum and then there’s a one to
six credit of free electives. Again, traditionally, the AS
BT is the transfer degree. Now we do have an Accounting Program. We have an articulation with
Queens College in Accounting so you could use, although
Accounting as an AAS, most AAS or career programs were designed with the notion of, you
would do these programs and go right to work. You wouldn’t be going on
to have any more schooling. So you’d do your AAS,
you’d go out to work, just like nursing, when
you think of being a nurse and things are changing
and times have changed, but if you do the AAS in nursing, the assumption is you’re gonna be a nurse. You go out and work in a
hospital and you’re a nurse. Nowadays I think, in terms of
strengthening the profession they’re asking for students to go back beyond the associates RN
to get a bachelor’s degree. With the AAS degree in Accounting, 20 years ago or so,
more people would go out and work for a Jackson
Hewitt or H&R Block. More students now are doing, and what’s good about this articulation is that Queens College basically, and Professor Villani’s
gonna talk about that again a little later, takes the
majority of the credits that you transfer from Queensborough when you get the degree. And I really wanna
emphasize in both cases, and what we do a lot in advisement in the four-year transfer office and our freshman
coordinators talk about this and the faculty talk about this, it’s really beneficial to you as a student to get the degree. I can’t emphasize that enough. When you transfer with
an associate’s degree, four-year college is whether
you’re going to Hofstra, whether you’re going to
Baruch, Queens, Stony Brook, they’re gonna take your,
all of your credits, and when you’re in a transfer
program particularly, so that’s something to think about. A lot of students come in, and in my days of doing this, and I think I’m in my 14th year or so of being in advisement,
although I know I look so young. (audience laughs) It’s 14 years, I can’t
believe it, this October. Students often don’t realize that, well they’ll say, I
just really wanna get in and get outta here as quick as possible. My friends are at four-year schools, I wanna get to the four-year school. I think if you’ve been
here for a little while you understand, and I hope
know some of the benefits of being in a community college. That you have smaller classrooms, usually better, more attention to detail in terms of being able
to get to your teachers, your faculty members. Yes, we have a big campus,
there are 15,000 students, but there are a lot of nice things about being in what I
call a community college where you’re really getting
some good core training to help you be fully proficient when you get to the four-year college. And it’s cheaper, so you can
never go wrong with that. The AAS is 20 credits of liberal arts. So you see the 31 to 36,
there were more liberal arts and science credits with the BT1. Does not include foreign language. So if you’re really opposed
to foreign language, and you don’t meet that exemption then this could be the
the program for you. And as you can see there are
40 credits of business courses and 25 in accounting. So it’s more specifically geared to giving you that business
and accounting background. And as you can see no free electives. So they’re not wasting any time, there’s no BSing with this. You’re getting right to
it, getting the skills so that you can become an accountant. That’s what it’s for. Required math courses,
this is also a big thing because I think sometimes our students get tied up on, well,
I really like business but I’m not the best math person. Obviously to do business, or to be in the business profession, you’d have to have some math background. Unfortunately that’s sort
of a requisite skill. So at QCC you’re required to
take four credits of math. Many times it ends up being
more than four credits because you may be
taking remedial courses, and I’ll have another slide to show that. But in terms of the program’s BT or BA, the math courses that you
need would be Math 128, 260, or 440, and 261 and 441 are offshoots of courses that you’d
need if you were going, whether it would be Queens or Baruch, to give you extra math coursework. And Mr. Muchita’s gonna discuss this with Miss Roopchand a little bit later. When I talked about needing math, four credits of math yes, but what some people don’t realize is that you also need to
get out of remediation. So if you came in needing
remedial coursework, let’s say it could look
something like this, where you have Math 10
and you need to take and pass Math 10 to move on to Math 120. Now Math 120 it is college
algebra and trigonometry. It is a course for credit, however that’s not the course that the Business Department requires for the degree. They would require that you have Math 128. So if we’re looking at
Business Administration you’d normally see on our sheets we put Math 128, 260 or 440. If you’re looking at
Accounting or the BA-2, you generally see Math 128 or 260. Now after you take the course, the math course for credit, so now we’ve taken Math
10, we’re out of remedial, we take Math 120, which is
algebra and trigonometry, and then we’re gonna go into that math that they want, that they
want in the department, whether you’re taking BT or BA, which is one of the courses
I talked about before. And then after you have
the math requirement you move on to Business
203 which is statistics, a lot of fun. (audience laughs) Let me just see. Okay, Queens College. We usually recommend that
students take Math 128 when they’re going to Queens. I know we have some other
things written on here. The recommended Math 128 meets
Queen’s QCC math requirement and meets the calculus requirement for their Queens College ECO 249 course which is required if you’re
going to Queens College. In terms of the math requirement, and we’re looking at Baruch, you see two options here. When we do give 128 as
an option for Baruch, but the better option particularly if you’re a stronger math student, I would say it’s usually
128 is the easier course, then it goes 260, then 440. If you’re a very good math student I think the easiest way, and I think my colleagues would agree, when I say easiest, easiest
might not be the right word, but the most prudent way
would be to take math 440 which is precalculus and 441. And you’ll see here, note, Baruch requires the calculus 441 or 261
for junior level status. So they’ll still accept
you if you had 440 or 260 as your required math because
that’s what you needed to finish the degree at Queensborough. But their preference, because you’ll have to do it there otherwise,
they need calculus, so you can do 261 or 441. So if you can fit in your schedule, the idea is, and you’re
not gonna lose your TAP as a result of doing
this, or financial aid, or you have an extra summer
where you wanna make up work, there’s nothing wrong with doing calculus, even though you don’t
need it for the degree. We often try to advise
students for the degree. So these are the courses
you need for the degree. But it’s also important to tell you here that depending on where you’re going you really wanna do research, because let’s say it’s Hofstra, let’s say it’s another private school, beyond the degree there’s some classes that you may be able to take that give you additional credits once you get to the four-year school. Because most four-year colleges will accept more than 60 credits. They generally will accept in a range of, it could be 75 to 80 credits, depending on where you’re going. And I believe I talked
about foreign language, but my colleague, Mr. Andre Coombs, is gonna give you a more
in-depth presentation on that. Thank you for your time. And I just wanted to
give you one little plug from advisement, we
started academic advisement on March 14th, and it goes to May 20th. Don’t wait until your grades
come in to get advised. Check the website, check
your email, Tigermail. We’re moving forward and we’re
gonna be doing that shortly and I’ll come up later to give you a quick demonstration on TigerTracks. Mr. Coombs. (audience applauds) Thank you. – Hi, as many of you all should know, all students regardless
of what their major is, must be placed by the
Foreign Language Department, must have a placement. Now the languages that we offer are Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, and Spanish. If you’re in the Business
Administration Program you may be required to
take foreign language. Now if you’re in the Accounting Program, the BA2, you’ll not require it. Now if you’re exempt from foreign
language at Queensborough, you can then take additional liberal arts and science electives. What qualifies to be exempt from the foreign language requirement? If you completed, as my
colleague, Mr. Kerr, mentioned, if you had three or more years of the same foreign
language in high school, you’re not required to take
foreign language, it’s optional. But you would have to go to the Foreign Language Department and demonstrate you had
three or more years. At this point in time, you can take the Foreign
Language survey online. They’ll help you with your placement. If you speak a language, native speaker, you should also speak to the
Foreign Language Department. And something else you should know, if you wish to take a language that we do not offer
here at Queensborough, it is possible for you to
take the class on ePermit and get credit for it here. So for example, let’s say
you wanted to take Japanese for example, and we don’t offer Japanese, you would go to the Foreign
Languages Department for information and they will allow you to take that class and bring it back here to qualify for your foreign
language requirement. So you may wanna speak to them about that. Now what are acceptable liberal
arts and science electives? if you end up taking, for example, Math 440 for your, which is precalculus, for your math requirement
in Business Administration, you can take Math 441. That will be considered
a liberal arts elective. The category for liberal arts elective and foreign language, it ranges between, I think six to eight
credits worth of coursework. So if you’re going to Baruch or you’re not sure where you’re going, then you may wanna try
to take the Math 440 and the Math 441. Now as far as the foreign
language requirements for Queens College and Baruch, I would recommend that you
contact those schools directly for the language requirements. Some schools make this entry based on your high school status, or then still may require you to do a certain number of semesters of foreign language, okay? All right, so thank you. (audience applauds) Oh, sorry. – [Man] Ready in two seconds. – [Vickie] Go back one. – Oops, okay. – [Vicki] Okay. – Okay, okay. At Queensborough, as of fall 2005, all students are required to take two writing intensive classes in order to graduate. Most of you have hopefully already taken at least one writing intensive class. For example, many of your
are business students, and you need economics
or history or finance. There are some sections of those classes that may be considered writing intensive. What you would have to do is you would have to check online through the CUNY schedule of classes to see which sections
are writing intensive. All writing intensive classes are our regular classes
here at the college that have an extra focus toward writing. You may have to do extra reports, papers or special projects. Generally speaking, there are no more than 25 students per section. Now many students believe
that, for example, English Composition One and Two counts toward the writing
intensive requirement here at Queensborough. But those two classes do not
count toward that requirement. English within itself is writing, so English does not fulfill your writing intensive requirement. So if you have any questions about your, if you’ve done these classes or not, when you contact academic advisement, you have the advisor check and see if you’ve completed those requirements, or are you still working on them, okay? Thank you. – [Brian] Just go into TigerTracks. – [Vicki] Do you want me to clear that? – You can, yeah, that’s fine. How many of you have used
our new CUNYfirst system for registration, just by show of hands? Okay, so everyone’s pretty much used it. I know if you’re here this semester you would have had to have used it. So I guess that was a trick question. But I wanted to make sure
you were paying attention. (audience laughs) I know we’ve had some challenges, we’re still working on it. I’ve dealt with a lot of
students who have said, why did you change to this system instead of eSIMS, eSIMS worked perfectly, it was fine. Well that’s sometimes, when you work in a university system you don’t always have all the options
to make your own rules. We’re a institution of
23 different campuses and there’s a Chancellor and other people beyond this campus that make decisions about what our technology
is gonna look like. So I will say there are a lot of benefits to this new system. You have a shopping cart feature which I think you’re allowed to use in about two weeks. You should really be checking again, my little plug, check your email for information on advisement because it’s that time. You wanna start looking early
to see what classes you need and what times work for your schedules so you get the classes at the right time. I wanted to talk quickly. – You know what, keep talking. – Okay, I wanted to talk quickly about, you would go into, when you used, how many of you are familiar with eSIMS? Because you used eSIMS, most of you are. Okay, eSIMS was a system that we use to go into what you’d call, like if you were gonna go on Blackboard, you go in there, you’d go into eSIMS to do your registration. You could also check the online schedule of classes that way. Through CUNYfirst, you can check the online schedule of classes
right off the homepage, and Professor Villani’s
gonna show you that in a second. I also wanted to do a quick demo because the way you would go into eSIMS, although we don’t have it anymore, I’m hoping you still log
into your CUNY Portal, do you still have, or remember
your CUNY Portal password? Okay, that’s good. Now I think it was sort of foolish that we didn’t have you
log in to the CUNY Portal to get onto CUNYfirst, ’cause
it would have made sense. And one of the reasons just to tell you why we changed from eSIMS platform to CUNYfirst, was did you notice that you no longer use
your social security number to identify you as a student. We’re using, and we were kind
of archaic in doing this, we’re probably one of the
only institutions that still, up to last year, required
students to give us their social security
number for something, where now you have,
instead of a nine-digit social security number it’s
an eight-digit Empl ID. So like an employee ID. You’re like an employee at the college, that’s what we say. So you’re have an eight-digit code, it’s usually a 120 or
122, you following me? Do you know what your numbers are? I mean I know you know your names, but you should look when
you login, it’s important, because you should know
what your number is. When you’re asked at
the Registrar’s Office to submit a change of curriculum form they’re not gonna ask you for your social. Your identifier now is your Empl ID. So just remember that, and
when you look and login, you all claimed your
accounts in CUNYfirst. Part of claiming your
account, you get your Empl ID. So you’ll know what it
is when you see a 120 or 122 that’s what they normally are, some are like 203 but
it’s normally 120 or 122. – [Vicki] Its defaultin’ to the login and I can’t get out of it. – [Man] That always brings
you to that page, ma’am. – It’s not.
(audience talking) – [Man] Did it go to classes? – [Vicki] It shouldn’t bring it to this. – [Man] Academic schedule of classes, is that what you’re trying to get to? – Yes.
– Yeah. – [Man] Close that page, academics, schedule of classes, up, up, up, there. – Class schedules?
– Yeah. – [Vicki] Oh they do have that. We talked about that. – We were able to do it another way. (man speaking faintly.
I guess, thank you very much. – [Vicki] Thank you. – We circumvented this the other day by just clicking on the homepage
on CUNYfirst and it worked, but maybe it’s different.
– But it does work, and I don’t, they have it set for login, but on our computers,
’cause what we normally do is we click on the CUNYfirst, and then to the, you got
the CUNYfirst home page and then on the right
it says summer classes, and you click there.
– And you get to CUNYfirst. – [Vicki] And you’ll get to this window. – [George] It’s a beeline, but not for us. – [Vicki] Okay, do you
wanna take it from there? What do you want me to do first. – So, just to, I guess you,
I’m sure you’ve seen this if you registered, I
know some of you had help probably in LB 24,
where we had a makeshift sort of Registration Center. The Registration Center this go-around is gonna be in A119. – [George] 119, not 119A. – A, administration, 119,
thank you Mr. Muchita. – Because 119A is my office.
– Right. (audience laughs) A119, yes, not 119A. So obviously you’re gonna
put your information in here for QCC fall. Let’s say we’re picking business because we’re looking at
business class availability. You must put it under graduate
when you go from here. – [Vicki] That’s right, that’s right. – And you search, and it processes, and processes, and
sometimes keeps processing. It does take a little longer. But guess what, I can
look at the same student in academic advisement
in the Freshman Academy in the four-year transfer office, where we couldn’t do that before. We used to have to do something called mudding you off the system, which means if George
wanted to look at you and I will had you up,
he would have to call me and say, Brian, John’s in my office can you get off his record so I can look at his courses. We don’t have to do that with this. It’s a windows-based
system, yes we’re moving into the high-tech era
of the 21st century. So here, what’s important,
you see where it says one to three and then 25? When we first started this,
a lot of students thought, or would call me and say,
Brian, how come there are only three sections of,
what are we looking at, Accounting, how can there
only be three sections? None of those times work for me. And I would say, they’re
only gonna show you three because it’s a panel. You have to click view all. When you click on view
all, then you can look and actually, expand beyond three, and you can see all 25 sections that are being offered. And that’s important, because
on the first go-round, I know people were confused by that but I wanna make sure
you’re aware of that. This is pretty commonplace. I wanted to make sure you were aware, and how to get here, dates. The other thing I wanted
to show you really quickly was how to access. Again you all said you would
go in through your CUNY Portal, so from the CUNY Portal how
do you get into TigerTracks? And TigerTracks is basically
the degree audit system. We have a program with DegreeWorks, which is a CUNY-wide system. All CUNY schools have this. And you can actually look and do, you can audit yourself
and look at where you are if you didn’t have access to an academic advisement checklist, that all of our departments have. – [Vicki] Oh, it’s the login. Are you gonna log in? – Yeah I’ll do it.
– Okay. – Just bear with me for a sec. I usually go from the. (panel chattering) – [Vicki] Yeah, the Queens. (panel chattering) – The homepage. – [Vicki] I can’t wait for
the (speaking faintly). (man laughing) – All right so CUNY Portal up here. So you’re, you do your normal login, okay? So it looks a little bit different for faculty and staff
than it does for students. But obviously, so I have
things you wouldn’t have, but what we both have
is Student Advisement Degree Audit DegreeWorks. So we click on there and
this screen comes up. Is everyone familiar with this screen? Some of you are, okay. I have a student who let
me borrow their Empl ID ’cause that’s how you have to get in. And he’s okay with you
looking at his coursework and his grades. He’s very bold. His name is Andrew, and so once you, now when you login it knows who you are. I have to put a student ID in, because I can look up anyone. You only have access to you. So when you login, obviously the login, based on the login it knows who you are and it would go right to Brian Kerr, ’cause that’s, you are
Brian Kerr the student. Now from here we do an audit. Every time you do an audit, you always wanna click on process new. It just makes sure it
verifies all the newest and up-to-date information. There’s actually a nice
piece on our website, and I think the Registrar’s website that was done by Phil and folks from Academic Computing Center, that does a nice tutorial
on how to use this system. So i know this is quick,
but i really wanted you just to see the raw format. So, you have a legend here,
complete, not completed, exempt, and then you see the student, when they came in, the degree they’re in. Now this student happens
to be liberal arts and science with math and science. Now I can do something
really interesting here. Let’s say you just decided
to change your major, and we went from liberal arts and science, and we were thinking
Accounting, right, that happens. Okay, that’s the catalog year. Accounting is the major, and process. So I’d started as
liberal arts and science, now I’m thinking of doing the applied associates in Accounting. So what it would do, it would show me what I still need. So we saw these checks, right? And then when we get here, okay, he needs an economics
class, and then obviously, since this student wasn’t
a business student, you can see that he still
needs Accounting One, two, intermediate, one,
two, ’cause he hasn’t taken any business classes. I just wanted to give you a heads up on how you’d use this system. And this is a good tool,
particularly if you’re thinking of switching over your
BT, or BS2, your BM. You wanna see what it would be like. How many credits would you
need to finish in Accounting, or if you’re Accounting and you wanted to do Business Administration, how could you sorta segue between both. So that was just a little precursor to a system we have,
that’s up and running, that you can use beyond the information that you get from the folks in advisement or your faculty members or
the four-year transfer office or the freshman coordinator area, okay? Thank you for your time. And you always wanna log outta this, because people can log back
in and play with your system. – You played (speaking faintly). – [Man] Thank you sir. (laughs) – Okay so you are here because you’re interested in transferring, and we’ve given you some
information about Queensborough, so now we’re going to
focus on transferring. I’m going to speak a
bit about Queens College in particular the Accounting Program and then Mr. Muchita
is going to speak about transferring to Baruch, and
the whole application process. And we presume you’ll have
a lot of questions on that, so we’re going to have Mr.
Muchita towards the end. In between we’re going to
allow our Hofstra guests to come up. So we’re gonna do Queens
College, then Hofstra, Baruch, and then move
into questions and answers because we’re sure you
have plenty of them, okay? I wanna repeat this. So we brought it up briefly before. You want to make sure that
the courses you take here transfer to whatever four-year college you choose to go to. So you wanna look specific
for course-to-course transfer. You will probably have some courses that go as electives. But you’ll find out that
most senior colleges, typically that you’ll take
a program with your major, most of the senior colleges have general education requirements and then typically there’s room for a lot of elective credits. Here at the community level
we only have 60 credits to work with, so we’re
really packed tight. But when you go over
to the senior colleges there’s usually flexibility for elective. But again you wanna go
mostly course-for-course, but having some elective is
not a terrible thing either. Just wanna mention to
you that Queens College is usually a liberal arts college and in the past just had
the BA in Accounting. In about the past five years they did start some Business
Administration Programs, in particular in finance,
international business, and actuarial studies. When you, if you wanna enter any of those three BBA programs, they look at your Accounting
One and Accounting Two grades, and your two economic
courses, SS 211 and 212. They claim that they’re looking for about a 2.7 to a 3.0 average
in those four courses, but what’s actually happening is so many students have applied and they only have limited seats, they’re really accepting students
with a much higher average in those four courses than what they have stated in their catalog. And that’s simply because of the demand and the competition, okay? But in Queens College,
eventually you will need two economics courses, and
I point that out because if you’re taking the Business
Administration Program, the BT1 program, you are required to do the both economics. In the Accounting Program,
BA2, you’re only required to take one economics,
but then you have room to take an elective. So you might wanna consider,
on your social science, history, or speech elective, taking the second economics course, because you’ll have to take it if you transfer the Queen’s, and then that’s being efficient. You’ve taken the two courses here, that’s one less course you need to take when you transfer. And we’ll point out again
that this is an issue. Over at Queens College you’ll have to take a statistics course which is ECO 249, or their Math 241, And calculus is a prerequisite for that. So if you, we normally recommend that students transferring
to Queens College, you need a four-credit math course here, one of those courses is Math 128. It transfers course-to-course
at Queens College as Math 131, which is a calculus course, and then you’ve met the prerequisite for Queens College ECO 249. So again, proper planning, be efficient. By taking the one four-credit course here, you’ve met the requirement for both Queensborough to graduate, and the prerequisite for when you get over to Queens College, okay? I just wanna briefly flip
over to something else here. As you can see I have
these little documents. Because I’m an accountant
and I work good with numbers and I put ’em in little boxes, so that’s kinda what I do. I’m just curious though,
how many of you here are interested in Accounting? ‘Cause that’ll gauge how
much time I spend on this. How many of those who are
interested in Accounting plan on transferring to Queens College? Quite a few, okay. What we like to do here,
very often what happens is when students are
thinking about transferring to a senior college,
typically advisors will say take the Business
Administration Program, BT1. And as Mr. Kerr pointed out earlier, that has a lot of liberal arts courses and typically liberal arts
courses transfer easier course-for-course over
to the senior colleges. And as Mr. Kerr also
stated, our AAS programs originally were designed for students that went out to work after completing the community college. But what we’ve discovered is that our Accounting Program
here, our BA2 Program, which gives you the AAS in Accounting, most of the credits transfer cost-to-cost to Queens College. So we encourage you, if you’re interested
in studying Accounting, and you’re looking to
transfer to Queens College, we want you to know that
almost all the courses, in fact 50 out of the 60 credits, go over course-for-course. So what I’ve designed
here is a little document to help prove that to you. Now Queens just went through a change about a year, two years ago, and some of our information
certainly has changed, and we’re still trying to get all the particulars worked out. We have been in touch, thanks to Mr. Kerr, with representatives of Queens College, but we have a few questions, so I did have this marked draft, it’s not showing here now, because we do have one or two questions. But overall, this
information is from Queens and it’s 98% accurate. So what I wanna show you here, and kinda briefly, is if
you go to Queens College you’ll take 56 credits in Accounting and six business elective credits, for a total of 62. Then Queens College has
the critical abilities, and I wanna say, even if
you’re not an Accounting major, these concepts apply to
most senior colleges. They might use different terminology, they might call it basic courses, or something other than
critical abilities, okay? So the terminology might
be a little different, but the concepts are pretty much the same. So in this category you
need to take English. At Queen’s it’s 110 and 120. Well your two English courses over here, 101 and 102, go over
course-for-course, okay? In terms of the writing intensive, you take two writing
intensive courses here, this is one area I’m a little hazy on but I think, if i’m
understanding it correctly, Queens College will only require you to take one writing
intensive at Queens College. So they’re accepting, if
I understand correctly, the two writing intensives
from Queensborough, and you only need to take one over there. And I’ll jump ahead and tell you, if you’re an Accounting major, you’re required to take Business Law two over at Queens College, and
that’s writing intensive. So there’s your writing
intensive course, okay? So again, the planning,
always the planning. Foreign language is tricky,
as Mr. Coombs said earlier. You’re best checking with Queens College. My understanding of Queens is if you don’t need language, no problem. If you do need language,
you’ll need three courses, four-credit, four-credit,
and a three-credit, a total of 11 credits. So that’s a little tricky. I think if you had a high
school foreign language Regents, you’re okay, and if you do
speak a second language, my understanding is they will
evaluate you, and if you pass whatever the requirements
are, you’re okay. So if you’ve never had
a high school Regents, or you didn’t take three years of language in high school, or you don’t
speak another language, then you’re probably gonna have to take foreign language, all right? But you might be able
to not have to do that. Then they have this abstract
or quantitative reasoning and several of our
courses that you take here meet that requirement also. Now they have this
Perspectives on Liberal Arts. They used to have another liberal arts and science category, this was replaced with the Perspectives about two years ago. Some of the information
on Queens College website, we still have a few questions on, so we’re working with Queens College. For instance, the chemistry
course is not showing as a course-for-course transfer. But we’ve been told it does transfer, so we’re just trying to
get all the documents up to date, all right? So this area is new,
but they basically have all these different
categories of liberal arts that you need to take. Now most senior colleges
will have some liberal arts or some general education requirements. Again, think ahead, plan. If you have room for extra credits here, take it in something that
will meet the criteria for the college you’re going to. All right, so here’s the whole list, I won’t go through it all, but
I’ll point out a few things. BU 301 here, you take that as, almost any business program here, you take Business Law, BU 301, that also meets the requirements for what they call Culture and Values, and it also meets their
requirements for United States. So here’s six credits that
you don’t have to take because that one course
met a few criteria. And that’s common in senior colleges. That one course will meet the criteria of a few different requirements. Again, so you always wanna plan. That’s why I say, do a long schedule. So Queens has these programs. So let me boil it down a
little more simply for you. Or it’s maybe not so simple. What I’ve done on the second page is compare all the courses you
take here at Queensborough, in the Accounting Program, all the courses you need at Queens College in their Accounting
Program, and basically, after leaving Queensborough,
what’s left to take? And I think I’ll just
fast-forward it a little bit and then if there are particular questions on Accounting we can back up to it, but in summary, what actually happens, of the 60 credits you take
in the Accounting Program here at Queensborough, 50
credits go course-for-course to your required courses, and some of them also meet the Perspectives
liberal arts requirement. 10 of ’em are elective credits. But look what happens here. Accounting One here is four credits. At Queens College it’s only three credits, so they give you three
credits for Accounting One and you end up with an
elective credit, okay? The same with Accounting Two. They give you three
credits course-for-course, one elective credit. Intermediate One, BU 103 transfers completely course-to-course. The big issues, and the ones the students always are concerned about is BU 104, our Intermediate
Part Two course. Queens does not accept
that course-for-course. They will accept it as elective credit. You’ll be required to
take at Queens College Intermediate Two, which
is a two credit course. And I can tell you from
experience from students that have transferred there and then come back here,
several of our students that tutor in the Learning Center continue to work here even though they go over to Queens College. And they repeatedly inform us, the accounting professors here, how difficult the Intermediate
Part Two course is. Here we meet four hours a week, it’s three credits. In Queens they meet three hours a week, it’s two credits and
they cover more material than we do here. And I’ll give you one example. A nice young man, Felix,
who tutored with us for many, many years, he
was an Accounting major, I had him several times, he
was a straight A student. He transferred over to Queens
but continued to work here, and he told me the first exam in Intermediate Part Two at Queens, only three people passed, and all of ’em had taken our Intermediate
Accounting first. And this was an A student, and he said the highest grade
was like a 78 or something. So it’s a much harder course. So what’s my point? You’re going to take an
extra two-credit at Queen’s, I do believe you’re more
successful in the long run if you complete the
Accounting Program here. Similarly with our Tax Course BU 108, you will have to take a Tax Class at Queens College. Most senior colleges will do income taxes in one four-credit course. It’s all theory, its Tax Law, they normally cover individual taxes, partnership taxes, and corporate taxes all in one course. It’s all theory, you’ll
never see a tax return. In our BU 108, we only
do individual taxes. You will actually prepare tax returns, you’ll actually work on the computer for part of the course. It’s a great course to have, whether you’re an Accounting major or not, so that if you’re paying
taxes down the road, making good income, paying some taxes, it’s a good course to have,
its good knowledge to have. But in terms of the Accounting Program, I do believe it’ll give
you a very good basis so you will do better
at the senior college, in particular here at Queens College. Okay, so most of these extra credits are because we have more
credits for a course than Queens, and it mentioned
Cost Accounting BU 110. You take Cost Accounting here, you get two credits, two elective credits, and then you proceed with
Cost Accounting Part Two at Queens College. So that’s what makes up
your 10 elective credits. But we do believe your chances of success at Queens College in
the Accounting Program are much higher if you
achieve your basis here first. So I think I will stop
with that at this point. We are gonna have question
and answers at the end, so if you have any
questions you can note them. At this time we’re gonna invite
our Hofstra representatives, Miss Gioia Bales and Miss Eryn Hornung to come up. They’ll speak a few minutes. We’re not done, we have Mr. Muchita, who’s going to talk about Baruch and the transfer application process within the CUNY system. And we’re sure you have
lots of questions there. Okay, there ya go. – Thank you very much. Again, my name is Gioia Bales. I am the Assistant Dean of the Frank G. Zarb School
at Hofstra University. Myself and Eryn Hornung are here today. Eryn is our Associate
Director of Admissions and she specializes in
helping transfer students join the Hofstra family. It took Eryn and I about
20 minutes to drive here, so the Hofstra seems
like it’s very far away but it really is not. It’s just right over
the the Nassau border. And we do hope that if you
are interested in Hofstra you’ll come to visit us. And I’ll be here afterwards. Eryn and I’ll both be here afterwards if you want to take
down our email address, contact us, we’d be happy to maybe arrange a visit to Hofstra with a tour, and you could see some of our facilities. I am going to talk
about, just a little bit, about what we feel makes the Zarb School of Business at Hofstra an excellent place to study business and earn your four-year degree. Eryn is going to address
more the admissions issues and the transfer credits,
and things like that. In order to tell you
about the Zarb School, and why we think it’s unique, I brought, and Eryn, if you don’t mind,
– Sure, sure. – I brought, just take one thank you. I brought a pamphlet for each of you that’s entitled, Why Zarb. And it basically goes
through in bullet points what we feel differentiates our program. Again, what makes it an excellent place to study business. And if you look through the brochure, we start off by talking about the fact that the Zarb School of Business is AACSB Accredited. Now what does that mean? Why is it important to you? Well the AACSB is an accreditation agency that rates schools of business. About a third of the schools that offer undergraduate
programs in business around the globe are AACSB Accredited. so it’s a differentiator. And so I would encourage all of you when researching a four-year degree that you make sure that the school is AACSB Accredited. Hofstra has had an AACSB accreditation for over 40 years, and in addition, we have separate accreditation
in our Accounting Program, which is, a very small subsets of schools have the additional
accounting accreditation. The next point that is
mentioned in the brochure is our rankings. Again, why is it important that Businessweek, US
News and World Report, The Princeton Review has ranked us among the top business
schools in the country? Well, it’s one thing for Eryn and I to tell you how wonderful Hofstra is, but it’s another thing
for an outside entity to come in and evaluate your program and say, yeah, you’re at the top. Just moving on, and I know we don’t have a lot of time and I am very grateful
for this opportunity. Our facilities are premiere at Hofstra. Hofstra was named in Princeton Review one of the best wired
campuses in the United States. I am also a finance professor, so I am particularly
proud of our trading room that we have, and in
fact there’s a photograph on the fourth page here of a student at a one of
the 34 Bloomberg terminals that we have in this trading room. I don’t know if you’re familiar
with the Bloomberg system or the mayor, Michael Bloomberg, this is where he made his
billions and billions of dollars developing a software, hardware system that is the industry standard for monitoring the financial markets. Bloomberg donated 34 terminals to Hofstra and we have the same type of information, both historical as well as real-time that a professional would have. So if you’re gonna work
at an accounting firm or at a investment bank,
or at a commercial bank, there’s gonna be Bloomberg’s there. And we have 34 of them at Hofstra, the largest academic
trading room in the world. We also have a very
active student population. We have 15 student organizations in the School of Business
on the undergraduate level. And they’re constantly bringing
in speakers, doing events. We also have two research centers at the School of Business,
one in real estate, and the other in International Financial Services in Markets. We are always doing conferences, seminars, and students are invited to all of the events including breakfasts, lunch, banquets, et cetera. Just to give you a quick example, in December we had a conference, the Zarb School had a conference on social responsibility in business. It was to celebrate
Hofstra’s 75th anniversary. It was an all-day conference followed by a banquet
where Ex-Treasury Secretary Paul O’Neill, who is a
good friend of Hofstra’s, gave the keynote address. Students were there. I wasn’t supposed to let any
of my undergraduate students drink wine, I don’t think
I did too well at that, but nobody said anything. But we had about 45 undergraduate students at that banquet. So our classes at Hofstra
are very small also. You’re not gonna get huge lecture classes. And our faculty is very involved. And the last thing I’ll say is just the majors that
we have at the Zarb School on the undergraduate level,
we also offer the BBA, the Bachelor of Business Administration. We have a degree in Accounting, Legal Studies in Business,
these are all separate, Accounting, Legal Studies in Business, Finance, Marketing,
International Business, Management, Entrepreneurship which is one of our newest majors, and also
is a fairly unique program at the undergraduate level, and Information Technology. I think I got them all. So those are our majors. Finally, we have developed
over the past year many five-year programs. And your professor was
talking about an efficient, efficiency of earning a degree. Well a five-year program,
and for you guys, it would be only three years, because you’ve already
done the first two years here at Queensborough,
but a five-year program. You come to Hofstra your junior year and in three years you earn your BBA and a graduate degree, either an MBA or an MS. How do you do that? Will you do it because some of the courses that you take in your senior year as an undergraduate double count for your undergraduate degree and your graduate degree. So that is something that
more and more students are looking at. These are tough financial times, and this is a very
time, cost-effective way to achieve success. Again, I’m glad to be here to
represent the Hofstra family and I look forward to
speaking to you afterwards. I’ll turn the mic over to Eryn. (audience applauds) – All right, so first and foremost I just wanted to extend another thank you for having us here. We always enjoy these opportunities to visit campuses and speak
to prospective students. So I know that we are focusing
on the area of business here but what I’d like to do for you is just highlight some of
the wonderful opportunities that Hofstra has to offer transfer students from Queensborough. Some great news is that we
have started the process in forming an articulation agreement with Queensborough. The other thing I’d like to say is that if you have any specific
questions about Hofstra, we work very closely with Mr. Muchita, so you can always visit the
Four Year Transfer Office to learn more about the exciting
opportunities at Hofstra. But with regards to the
articulation agreement, like I mentioned, we have started building a stronger relationship
with Queensborough. The other highlight to that is that as recently as a month ago, the entire catalog and course catalog from Queensborough was evaluated. All the courses in all
the different areas. They were all evaluated by
our department chair persons on campus at Hofstra. So you can actually go on to our website, and again it’s as
up-to-date as a month ago, And check out the admission website, transfer students credit evaluations, and pick Queensborough Community College and there will be a drop-down menu of every course you could
have possibly taken here at Queensborough, and how
they transfer over to Hofstra. so you can get a head start in terms of taking a
look at your transcript and seeing how those
courses transfer over. Just to speak a little bit
about the transfer credits, general rule of thumb is
that we accept 64 credits from a community college. If you’re a business major, 65 credits from a community college. We actually just underwent last year a revision of our transfer credit policy. It is much more flexible. Your credits now go farther at Hofstra. So the idea there is really just that you are able to fulfill many more of our distribution requirements. I know that they’re
called something different at every school, you had mentioned that. For us, the liberal arts requirements, regardless of your major, are called distribution requirements. It’s made it much more,
it’s an easier transition for you to take your Queensborough credits and transfer them the Hofstra and have them apply and count
towards these distribution or these course-by-course
counting classes, like you mentioned. So the goal there is
really so that you come in as a junior and get started
right on your degree. And you don’t have too many more of those distribution requirements left to take. Foreign language has come
up quite a few times, so I’ll talk very quickly about your foreign language requirement as business majors. As a business major,
the only business major that actually has a foreign
language requirement is international business, rightfully so. But all the other business majors, you do not have a foreign
language requirement. Good, eh? (audience laughs) All right, another opportunity that I wanted to highlight for you is the opportunity to earn some merit based transfer scholarships. We are a private institution, so the tuition that you’re paying is a little bit higher than
some of the other schools that have been mentioned today. But the benefits of pursuing
an undergraduate degree at a private school, in terms of earning merit-based scholarship money, our transfer students are considered for merit-based scholarship money typically if you have
about a 3.0 GPA or higher. And our scholarships
range from $2,000 a year, upwards to $15,000 a year. So there’s a real opportunity for you to earn some scholarship money in terms of financing
your education at Hofstra. We also have a PTK Scholarship. It’s for fall admission only, and that scholarship
is a competitive award. Again, you can speak to Mr. Muchita about the guidelines for that. But that could potentially
be an additional $2,500 per year if you meet the criteria for the PTK Scholarship, and
you’re awarded that money. So $17,500, in terms of
merit-based scholarship money. It’s a great opportunity for Queensborough students to pursue. In terms of your transfer credits, if you’re interested in finding out, like I said, I suggest
to check out the website. The other thing that you can do is visit campus. We definitely encourage
students to visit campus. We have campus visit opportunities Monday through Saturday. And then in the summertime,
Sundays as well. So our campus is open to you. And like Gioia had mentioned, it really is only a 20-minute commute, so pretty quick for you. So come and visit campus. We also have Transfer
Center available for you Monday through Friday. Different appointments,
about two hour blocks of time throughout the day. What you can do is, you don’t
even have to have applied to come to Transfer Center. You could could be a prospective student, just interested in speaking
to an admission counselor and finding out about
your transfer credits ahead of time. I think a common theme of all of this, and i think this is wonderful that you do this for these students, is plan, plan, and plan some more. If you have a couple of
different institutions that you’re interested in attending, do the planning ahead of time. It’s gonna make it that
much easier for you to then complete your
associates degree here and then have that smooth transition to your four-year school. So Transfer Center is
an opportunity for you. Like I said, you bring a
copy of your transcript, you meet with myself or my
colleague, Maria Campanella. We’ll do a credit evaluation right there on the spot for you and then you’ll sit down with
an Academic Advisement Dean. And that’s important
because I can tell you and assure you that all 65 of your credits are gonna transfer over, but the Advisement Dean is the one that is going to show you how they apply towards your degree. So you can take care of all of that in an hour spent on our campus. I mean if you guys have
any specific questions, we’ll be here afterward. I definitely encourage you
to speak to Mr. Muchita if you have any specific
questions about Hofstra. But the scholarship opportunities and the other thing about Hofstra that Gioia had mentioned is, in terms of Hofstra and giving you that close personal attention, there our average class
size is 22 students, So you may not be changing very much from what you have here at Queensborough. We only have about 8,000
undergraduate students. So you are able to have a relationship with your professors, and keep that. There’s a 14 to one student
to faculty ratio at Hofstra. We don’t have lecture halls
that hold 300 students. So you definitely will be
a name to your professor, you’ll build strong relationships with the faculty members on campus and that will only enhance
your academic experience there. And the internship opportunities, there’s endless potential for you. We have a phenomenal
Career Center as well. We do job and internship
there every semester. You can utilize the Career Center from the time that you
step foot on campus. They do resume building and
critiquing mock interviews so that we can kinda employ you with those skills that you’ll need for when you go out and start your career in the field. Anything else you can think of that I? (audience laughs) No, good, need to cover? Thank you very much.
(audience applauds) – Thank you very much. I invite you to put
your contact information up on the board. We’re going to finish up with Mr. Muchita, who’s going to speak about several things that’ll be of interest to you. When the question answer period opens up, I’m going to put back up on the screen all of our contact information, so if you need to speak with any of us or wanna make appointments, you’ll have that contact information. – One thing I wanna reiterate, what was just said by the
representatives from Hofstra is that if you do go out to Hofstra they also have a bus that’ll meet you at the Long Island Railroad Station and carry you to the campus,
and it costs nothing. – [Woman] Yes. – I was just there two
and a half weeks ago. – [Vicki] Transfer Council? – For the Transfer Council breakfast. Now, most of you are here
to hear about Baruch, am I correct? – [Audience] Yeah. – [Woman] Finally. – Well the first question you will hear when you walk into my office is, okay, what’s your curriculum and where do you wanna transfer and why? Not too many people can
answer that question. The one answer that I do hear, Queens College, it’s
convenient, big mistake. You should always look at the institution and see what the institution
has to offer you. Not because it’s convenient, where you can roll out of bed and be there in 15 minutes. If Queens College is good, yes. Accounting, you will
have no argument with me. Go to Queens College. If you want Business Administration, there are plenty of schools out there that offer Business Administration. There are plenty of schools that have integral programs that’ll help you. For one, I’m an MBA graduate. I did not go to CUNY. I’ve been working at CUNY for 37 years, but I did not get my MBA from CUNY, I went private. I had to look and see what
the school had to offer me and what I could do with it. And I think I’ve done quite well. I’m not saying don’t go to CUNY, but I’m saying just do your research. Find out what schools have to offer you. What size are the classes? What types of programs they have? What they can do for
you once you graduate. Their placement office,
where can they place you? How can they get you a job? What kind of job they can get you? You look at all of that and you can make a valid decision and an educated decision
and then move on your way. As you were told by everyone here, planning, planning, planning. That’s the key for planning. Looking at the total
picture, not just myopically through narrow eyes. Just look at the whole thing. Now, back to Baruch. Baruch will accept all of our credits if you do to be on the BT1 curriculum. The one thing I told students is that I push them to take 440 and 441. If you take the 441, you
don’t have to do the exam, the placement exam once you get there. If you’re going into business, you’re going to need a
strong math background. I didn’t have a problem with math on the undergraduate
level, in high school, or anything like that. But when I got to graduate school and I had to do probability,
it kicked my butt. (audience laughs) So if you cannot do 441, you’ve got issues ahead of you. So make sure that you
are strong in your math when you’re going ahead in that field. Grade point averages. The grade point average varies
from semester to semester. Students will come back and tell me, well, all I had was a 3.2 and I got in. But, how many students
applied when you got in? The way the university system works is that they will put
everyone from CUNY in one pool and everyone from the private industry and from the high schools, they’re looked at separately as, they’re looked at separately. Now when you apply, if you
apply by the deadline date which Baruch adheres to,
there are two of them. February 1, for fall admission, and September 15th for spring admission. If you wanna get into Baruch, you have to apply by that deadline date. And when I say apply, that
means your application has to be in, your
transcript from Queensborough and any other higher ed
institution that you’ve attended, has to be in, as well as
your high school transcript. You may have given your
high school transcript to Queensborough, but the university does not have your high school transcript. If you graduated from high school here in the United States, you need
to contact your high school and have them send it in. No if, ands or buts about it. If it’s not in, your
application won’t be processed. If you have your GED, or you were educated at a high school outside of the US, you can send a photocopy
of your high school diploma or your GED, and they will accept that. I know it seems unfair,
but for some reason this is the university’s policy. When Baruch looks at your
transcripts from Queensborough, well when the university
looks at your transcript, if you’ve graduated with
your two-year degree from a two-year CUNY School, the required GPA is 2.75. The minimum GPA is 2.75,
that’s only with your degree. If you don’t have your degree, the stakes are much higher. For example, there was one semester where if you had less than a 3.7, you did not get into Baruch. That’s without the degree. ‘Cause then you’re placed in a pool with other students from CUNY schools, you’re placed in a pool with students from private institutions
trying to transfer in, as well as students that are
graduating from high school. You’re all trying to get
into the Zicklin School. And with the enrollment numbers as high as they are right now, it’s become very difficult. At one point last fall, I think there was an applicant pool of 100,000 students
trying to get into CUNY. That’s because of the cost. It costs $4,000 to go to CUNY for a year, $45,000 a year to go to private schools. Well, some private schools, not all. So that’s where people are
going for their undergrad. They will, they would rather go to CUNY and spend minimal amount
and save all of their money for when they go to grad school, ’cause that’s where it’s going to cost. So remember, you’re better
off getting your degree and transferring to the four-year schools. And if you have that for 440 and 441, that math will carry into
any college in the country. As opposed, I’m not going
to say that 260 will not, but that 440 and 441 will transfer without a problem.
(fingers snapping) You get a C or better,
you’re in like gold, because everyone wants precalc and calc. You don’t have to worry about it. As far as the economics are concerned, there’s no way around it, we must do it. Now as far as the
application is concerned, what you need to do with the application, the website is the CUNY Portal. You have to go to CUNY Portal. It’s www.cuny.edu, which was the site that everyone has touched on before. You click on there and that’ll take you to the sign in page, and
there’ll be a spot on there. You wanna, can you click on that? – [Vicki] This one? – Yeah.
– On here? – That’s the page. What you can do is click
on future students. – [Vicki] You have to. (laughs) – Click on future students
and apply to CUNY. Undergraduate, everyone
here is an undergrad, and at this point in time
we’re looking at spring 2012 and that’s what you’ll be applying for. You complete the application,
answer all questions, including what you’re
currently registered for and what you’ll be registered
for the following semester. Once you get through that application, you will click on submit and print. What’ll occur then is
that it will print out a copy of the application
for you for your records. Submit, it will send it to the university. Now they will have your application. At that point in time it’s up to you to go to the Registrar
here at Queensborough, have them send in your transcript. Don’t wait for the university
to pull down your transcript. even though they have that ability. What’s occurred in the past was that they would go to the wrong institution, not get a transcript,
and assume the students had a hold on their record, and stopped processing the application. I’ve seen that happen several times. So what I tell the students, you take control of your own life, you make sure the transcript is sent in. If you tell the Registrar
they have to send it in, the Registrar must send the transcript in. So you’re sending in your
transcript from Queensborough and any other college you’ve attended. You’re sending in your
high school transcript, and so that you don’t have to
pay the $70 application fee, you’re sending in proof that
you are going to be registered for that last semester. Meaning, if you’re applying
for the fall semester, you have to show them proof
that you’re registered at a CUNY School the spring semester. That’s going on to CUNYfirst and just printing out
your registration schedule and mailing it in. That’ll exempt you from
a $70 application fee. (woman speaking faintly) Excuse me? – [Woman] (speaking faintly)
my $70 (speaking faintly). – Well then, I would ask for my 70 back. (audience laughs) If you’re currently registered, you do not have to pay
that application fee. It’ll take them some time. You should get it back. If you don’t get a back, contact me and I will do what I can, and
I will get it back for you. When you’re applying to private schools, schools outside of CUNY, ask about application fee waivers. ‘Cause I know when my son applied, he applied to 13 colleges. And you’re looking at
$100, $150 per application. It’s a costly, costly thing to do. He got away with murder. I don’t know who your parents are, they may not appreciate it. I don’t know what your pockets are like, but always ask if they have
an application fee waiver. If they do, go for it. There’s no harm in asking. SUNY, when you go to the SUNY website, which is suny.edu, you
complete that application and there is a step in there to apply for an application fee waiver. There they will waive the
fee for up to four colleges. That application costs $50 per college. You can apply to four
colleges, that’s $200. But if you meet the income requirements, the guidelines that
they set on that waiver, you complete that form,
bring it to my office, I will sign off and
then you will be waived for four colleges, the
fee for four colleges. But this process is something that you have to take
and you have to do it in a timely manner. If you don’t do it in a timely manner, then you’re left out in the cold. Currently, Queensborough
is trying to do something for you to make the whole process easy, which is our Academic Audit Program. We’re trying to let students
know a semester in advance that there is a possibility
that you may be graduating. So with that, you’ll be alerted, well, these are the only
courses I have left to take, I know I have to do that. These are the, these are the
steps that I have to take to transfer to a four-year school, then I know what to do in that situation. I notify students from my office when they’ve completed 45 credits or more that now is the time to start
thinking about transferring. I do it through Tigermail. You will not get a letter from me through the the US Postal System. So, before you start
deleting your Tigermail, which I know people do
because I have a read receipt on everything I send out. So if you deleted without
reading it, I know. But what I say, what I say to you is now, I’m sending out information
about transfers, I’m sending out information that other colleges send me. I’m also sending out
information about scholarships. So if you see Muchita in there, before you delete it, read it. That’s all I ask. Basically, you have anything? – [Vicki] Questions. – Yes. – [Natalie] One of my students
emailed a couple questions, ’cause she couldn’t be here
and going to Queens College. – Stand up. – These are a couple questions
that a student emailed me, she could not be here today. One of the questions was
that she took Spanish one semester, in terms
of the foreign language, maybe Mr. Coombs, and she did not want to do LS 112. She wanted to know if she
could have done French. Would she need to go back and do the two semesters of French? – [Man] You need two semesters of French. – Of the same.
– Of the same language. – Okay, ’cause that’s the question most students come through the office and they ask. – The question was
about foreign languages. You must take the same foreign language. You cannot take one
semester of one language, another semester of another language. It must be the same language. – In terms of the CUNY application? I think it requires at
least four colleges? – A maximum of six colleges.
– Six. – [George] You can place on there. – Most students tell me they put one, what is your recommendation
in terms of that? – If you put one college, and right now with enrollment being so tight, if there’s no room for
you in that one college, your application will
be placed on the side and not be processed until later on. In any situation, if
you know they are two, for example, if you’re
trying to get into Baruch, you can put down Business Administration and put down another business curriculum or you can put down liberal arts. I know in the past they
would not take students who are accepted into the
School of Liberal Arts and allow them to transfer
into the Zicklin School. Right now, at this point in
time, that’s been relaxed. ‘Cause there is a double
application process. To get into Zicklin, first
you have to be accepted into Baruch and then they will review your application again to see whether or not you
meet the qualifications to get into Zicklin. I say do not put down one school. Brooklyn College has an
excellent business program. York College has an excellent Business Administration program. They even have a program
called Business Administration in the Aeronautics industry, which there is only one
of the school in the city that offers a BBA in the
aeronautics industry, and that’s Vaughn College of Aeronautics, over by LaGuardia Airport. The thing with York is
that they require you to take a semester of flying lessons as part of the program, and it falls under the curriculum. So you need, like I said before, you need to look at
all schools in the area to see where you can go,
with that institution, and with that program,
with that curriculum. – [Natalie] Last question. Sometimes students are referred to the Business Department to get advice. Can you just reiterate
the amount of credits that they can, the difference between going to academic advisement and coming to the Business Department? – Just in case. Students who come to academic advisement generally have under 25 credits. So when you have 25 or more earned credits and you have a GPA of,
let’s say a 2.0 to 2.74, you’d go to an academic
department for advisement. If you have a 2.75 or higher, with 25 or more earned credits, generally you don’t have to be advised, ’cause we do have a
mandatory advisement policy, but you don’t need to be advised, you can actually self-advise, and you’ll have a appointment date on the CUNYfirst system, and
you’ll see that when you look. It’ll say your shopping cart can be used on this date, but your
enrollment date is X, and I think it’s probably
sometime in mid-April. I don’t know the exact date
off the top of my head, it might be April 13th for
the WEP students we call them, which are the students who have, again, 25 or more earned credits,
2.75 or higher GPA. And you can look at our website. It gives you all the specs on who you are, and where you’re supposed to go. Good question. – [George] Before we move
on, with the shopping cart, could you explain that putting
classes in the shopping cart doesn’t necessarily mean you’re
registered for that class. – Yes, thanks for reminding
me, that’s a good point. Again, with this new system, we did find about 700 or 800
students in this go-around for Spring 11, who thought they
were registered for classes because they put classes
in the shopping cart but didn’t press, there’s a, once you have the classes in the cart that’s great, but you have to press submit, or there’s something that you have to do, there’s another step. Just putting the classes in and not doing anything doesn’t
mean you’re in the classes. So we found that there were students who thought they were enrolled but weren’t because they never followed the steps. So just make sure, and
what happens sometimes, you put classes in the
cart, they’re not all open, so when you press
submit, three of the five that you selected may go through, but the other two, maybe they were closed. So you wanna just pay attention to that. Don’t assume that because it’s in the cart you’re in that for fall 2011. Thank you. – [George] Now there are mics
in the middle of the room. If you have any questions,
feel free to ask. One thing I want to point out is that up here in the
front, I have these brochures that come from CUNY. They list every single
curricula that CUNY offers at every single school of CUNY. So you can take one of these and see what program did you want and what institution offers that program. Now questions, yes. – [Student] Yes I got a language, suppose I know very well, I know, I know how to read, I know how to write and I can speak properly. So is it possible that you could speak it, that’s the reason I
didn’t take in high school any language classes,
because they told that since I know it, I don’t have to take it. So would it also apply here or not, just in case? – That you would have to go to the Foreign Language Department and they would make that determination. The public schools are
a little bit more lax than the colleges are as far
as requirements are concerned. So speaking with the Department Chair, they and only they would give you the waiver for that. And make sure you get it in writing and that the Registrar gets a copy of it. – [Student] All right. – Okay, her question was, in high school, she speaks, reads and
reads Bangli fluently. She wanted to know whether or not we would accept that as fulfilling
her language requirement. And my response was
speak to the chairperson, and this goes for anyone
with any language. You go to the Foreign Language Department and let them make that determination. You have any question
about any requirement, speak to the department chairs. They are the only ones who can waiver those requirements for you. Yes, and make sure you get it in writing. Yes. – [Student] Okay, About
the application process? – Yes. – [Student] Say if I applied to Baruch, put them as number one, then I put Queens College as two, and I don’t get into
Baruch for some reason and Queens College won’t accept me because I didn’t put them first. – Queens College, okay, the question was, if the person puts Baruch down as their number one choice,
Queens as their second choice and they don’t get into
Baruch for some reason and Queens decides not to accept them because they were not the first choice. Queens doesn’t know what
choice you are, all right? It’s a completely blind process. Everything goes to the university, nothing goes to the institution
right away, go ahead. Nothing goes to, you’re
not applying to the school, you are applying to the university. So the university
receives your application. The university processes your application. They will see, if you
don’t meet the requirements for your first choice then
they go to your second choice. That’s why it’s important
that you put down more than one choice. First here, then there okay, yes. Could we keep the noise down so we can hear the questions please? – [Woman] We ran out of
your (speaking faintly). – Okay we have, we have
more of those brochures in my office, Administration
Building 119A. All right, yes sir. (students chattering) (man speaking faintly) Okay, the question, excuse me. Come here, you wanna ask the question so everyone can hear it? Yeah, okay, this is a
question I want everyone to listen because it
may affect some of you. Go ahead. – There are students
that have 60 plus credits in a community college, ’cause
I’ve graduated from here, and I need to take Accounting courses. And I was wondering if I were to take all the 60 credits in this school and then transfer to Queens College, which will probably be
an additional 12 credits I gotta take ’cause Auditing One and Two are not there, and Cost
Accounting Three and Four, Two and Three actually. Would that be a wise thing to do, to just go to Queens College for just one or maybe
a semester and a half, like meaning 12 credits, and then maybe another four credits after that? – Yes sir. – [Man] You get it? – No I don’t. – Now you went, you already
graduated from Queensborough. – Yeah. – You have that degree. Now you’re going currently
to Queens College? – No, I used to, I
haven’t (speaking faintly) – You used to go to Queens
College and you have credits over there as well. Okay, now, what you would do, if you wanted to go back to Queens College you would have to apply to Queens College as a readmit student. They would look at your grades from before and look at the courses
that you completed before and for the curriculum that
you are currently applying to, and they would see how those credits fit into that curriculum,
and then they would add them all together
and see whether or not you’ve met the requirements. – But what I’m saying is that I also take all the classes over here, I’m just missing Business Law Two and also Auditing One and
Two and that would be it. – Well see, I can’t say
what Queens would do. – [Vicki] I would have to
look at all the specifics, but as Hofstra mentioned, they take either 60 or 65 credits. Whatever college you
intend to transfer to, all senior colleges have a maximum amount that they will transfer in. And I believe Queens it’s 75 credits. So you don’t wanna end up
taking more courses here. You said you already have a degree here. If you end up with 90 credits here they won’t take more than 75, you’ll end up just losing those courses. And I believe it’s 70 credits for Baruch. But just be aware of that. Wherever you transfer to,
find out the maximum credits that they will take from
any community college so you don’t keep taking courses here and then you end up losing ’em. – [Student] Well wait, I. – [George] No he went to Queens before. – Yeah, I understand that. But I’m worried about
his quantity of credits. – [George] Yeah, but the number of. – You have got Queens records. – We cannot say what Queens will accept. We cannot do that. We can’t say what any school will accept other than Queensborough. But given by what you said,
that you have credits here, you also have credits over there, a little bit over there. Now if you want ’em to apply
towards your degree here, that’s one story. But if you want them
to apply to the degree over at Queens, only Queens
can answer that question. But I can tell you that they will not take more than 75 credits. So if you’re at that point where you’ve got 60-some
odd credits from us and you’re nearing 75,
you need to stop here and go on to the four-year institution. – [Student] I have already. – Well, you need to stop here and go on to that four-year school. And that holds true for any school or any person or any program. Do not take more than 75 credits at a two-year institution. – [Student] But what
happens to those credits? – Those credits, they will be lost, they are considered lost. – [Student] They’re not electives? – They’re not electives. If they’re only going to take 75, 75 is the cutoff. At that point in time you need to move on. There are some schools
that will accept up to 90, but you have to find out
from that institution. That could be a combination
of 60 or 70 credits from a two-year school, and 15 to 20 from a four-year school. But the institution, the
receiving institution will make that determination of as to how many credits they will accept, which credits they will accept. So you have to start
speaking to them early. Yes ma’am, you wanna step down to that mic so we can hear. Oh come on, don’t be shy. – [Student] This is just one question. – Okay. – [Student] Recommendation,
say I do complete this whole degree. – Keep the mic still. – [Student] Huh? – Keep the mic still, I can hear you. – [Student] Say I could, I
complete the whole degree and then I transfer it to Baruch, how long should I put that off, as long as I’ve had my associates degree? – What do you mean put it off? You mean stop going to school here? – [Student] By put if off,
going to a four-year school, is there a certain type, a time frame? – It’s suggested that you
do it on a continual basis. As soon as you finish here, move right on. Your next to last semester here is when you should be applying
to the four-year schools. – [Student] Okay – They understand that your final grades are not in, everyone knows that, even within CUNY, the private schools, they’re aware of that also. They will be looking at
your preliminary transcript. The one that you have in your hands or the one that Queensborough sends them. They will make a determination based upon what they see. And if they’re not sure,
they can always ask you for a final transcript – [Student] So if I hand
in my transcript now, and say I’m graduating in June, and I mean now, I can only
apply for the spring semester. Basically they’ll look
at my transcript now. – I would do the application now anyway, even though we’re past the deadline date for the other schools, other than Baruch. – [Student] For fall? – For Brooklyn, the private schools, York, still do your application. – [Student] For fall? – For the fall, yes. – [Student] Okay. – And what’s going to
happen with those students, this is only within CUNY, they will be placed on a waiting list. The private schools have
their own deadline dates. Ours are the early ones, yeah. – Yeah, just very quickly. In terms of Hofstra specifically, we operated on a rolling admission basis, so there’s no firm deadline in terms of when to apply. So if you’re still, just to
get in the fall semester, you can absolutely
still continue to apply. We have paper applications, with, I know, Mr. Muchita mentioned this. Paper application has
a $70 application fee, the online application
has a $50 application fee. We also accept a common application. If you’re interested in
getting a fee waiver, you could always email me and let me know that you’re submitting your application, I can take care of that for you or you can go through Mr. Muchita. But in terms of the fall semester, we accept applications and students and register students all the way through ’til the end of the summer. And then in terms of the spring semester we suggest you have your application in by November 1st, but again, we operate on a rolling admission basis. So all the way through January
of the spring semester. So you do it again. – Yes, sir, you’re on. – [Student] Yeah, you mentioned before that I think that one of
the positives of Baruch is that you have to
provide your high school, like all, all. – No, this is CUNY regulation, not Baruch. This is a CUNY regulation, it’s CUNY. – [Student] Oh, CUNY regulation. Is it, so then is your
high school transcript placed in the review, or
it’s just a policy then. – If you’re graduating
from a two-year school, it’s not being placed in review. The reason why they’re requesting the high school transcripts,
several years ago, the state did an audit. And since they’re
processing the applications and students are saying that
they graduated high school, the state wanted them
to have proof on file that these people did actually
graduate from high school. Not that the units had it, because when you came
to us we requested it. But we didn’t process the application, the University Application
Processing Center processed the application. So they’re just saying that, if you’re processing the application and students are submitting
documentation to you, these or this is one of the documents that you need to have on file, that’s your high school diploma. – [Student] Would I be able to get that from this school itself? Because I think my high.
– No. – We can’t, we cannot send out that, because we’re not the issuing institution. – [Student] Well it might
have been closed by the city is what I’m saying. – Yeah but the Board of Ed
still has central files. You can get that information
from the Board of Ed. – [Student] Okay. – Everything is there, okay?
– All right, thank you. – And one thing that you
also should remember, that like some of the private schools, if you transfer after
completing only one semester or two, and have only 24 credits, they will look at your
high school transcript and it will carry some weight. So your best bet is
going with your degree, taking all of your credits with you, not having them look at your high school if you don’t have a
stellar high school record, and just going with all of your credits. Yes, one second. – [Student] I got a question for Hofstra. To get into the Zarb
School, what is the GPA? – In terms of applying to Hofstra, one of the nice aspects
of applying to Hofstra is we have 145 different majors. Once you’re admitted at a
transfer student to Hofstra, you’re admitted into
all the different majors with very few exceptions. The only program that it didn’t have a secondary application to is the Physician Assistant Studies Program in the School of Education. So once you’re admitted
as a transfer student into Hofstra, you’re admitted into the Zarb School of Business and all the business programs. For transfer students in general, rule of thumb in terms
of admission criteria, if you have the 24 or more credits, it’s a solid C plus GPA. We’re looking for about 2.5 GPA and then a 3.0 and
above will be considered for scholarship money. – Yes. – [Student] I know from here, that means if you meet the prerequisites
of all the classes, in the four-year schools, can you take different
classes at different levels or certain classes you can only take at certain levels. I know these classes are upper freshmen and lower freshmen. – Okay, the question
that was being asked is, are you restricted from
taking some courses depending upon the number of credits you have completed? And the answer is yes. You have to be a junior to
take junior level courses at a four-year institution. Junior level courses, you’re a junior once you’ve completed 60 credits. That’s why students feel
that they can leave here and go to the four-year school and start with their major right away. You cannot do that, you
cannot take those junior and senior level classes until you’re at that level. Yes? – [Student] Are the seniors, starting classes only supposed to be taken at a senior level rather
than junior level? – According to some institutions, yes. Some institutions do
have that requirement. So that really doesn’t behoove you to leave here to go to, for example, you take English 101 and
102 at Queensborough. As opposed to taking English 101 and 102 at Queens College. Your tuition is gonna be higher
for the same exact course. – [Student] Right. – All right? But if you wanna transfer over there just because you believe
you can take your courses in your major, that cannot be done, because you cannot take those courses until you reach a certain credit level and that would be your
junior or your senior level. – Can I add somethin’ there? Baruch in particular, the goal is that you transfer in as a junior there. In particular, you have to
have both economics courses which is required in our
Business Administration Program. The BU 512 also required, and calculus, meaning Math 261 or 441. So if you only took the precalc as your four-credit math course here, you’re missing the calculus, Baruch won’t take you in as a junior. So that’s why we recommend
if you don’t need language, you take the 441. They’re very particular about that. – [Student] I was taught when
you passed (speaking faintly) classes they do have to take you. – Yeah, no, classes within your major. You still, if you’re not a junior, and you have 50 credits, you
are enough for sophomore. And those courses that you’re speaking of that are in your major or your expertise, which will be in the future, if you’re not a junior,
having that 60 credits, you can’t take those classes. So you’re locked out until
you get to that point. Once you get to the 60
credits, that door opens, the junior level course door opens and then you can take those. The senior level course door won’t open until you get to 90
credits, all right, yes. – [Student] Since you do
not get to 70 at Baruch. – [Vicki] Go to the next one. – [Student] What would they need to take, do they need to take any
additional math courses? – Well if you don’t, if you
haven’t taken the 441 here, yes you will have to
take the placement exam and place yourself out
of that course there or take the course there. But theoretically you’ve
left here with 60 credits, so you will be a junior
when you walk in the door. – [Student] But they won’t let
me take the classes, right? Until I do 441. – But you will still have to
take that calculus course. – A question over here.
– Yes. – [Student] So you’re saying that it’s better to take the
440 and the 441 here before we go to Baruch? – I recommend that you
take the 440 and 441 here, to every single student who’s
in Business Administration, no matter what school they
plan on transferring to. Baruch especially, because
then you’d be exempt from taking that placement exam. – [Student] Yeah, but the
thing is my major’s Accounting, (speaking faintly). Does that mean I have to take it, or just do the 441 SA. – Do you wanna speak to that as a former Baruch student? (panel laughs) – [Vicki] Have you taken 440 already? – [Student] No, I haven’t taken, I simply wanna know which
one (speaking faintly). – [Vicki] They won’t let
you just go into 441. – [Natalie] You will
still need to take 440, despite your major being
Accounting at Baruch. – This young lady, she’s
an Accounting student and wants to know whether or not she would have to take the 441. It’s recommended that she takes the 441, especially if your going to Baruch. If your going to Queens, that’s a horse of a different color. – [Vicki] You should also
check with the Math Department because they won’t let you
just jump over certain courses. They have some exams,
and they will find out if you can place higher
based on past math classes and range on the placement exams. But most likely, you will not be able to just go right into 441. – I just wanna mention that most students have come through my office,
they ask me all the time, what do I need to get into Baruch. As much as you wanna take courses that’s gonna transfer, you also wanna fulfill your requirements here. What the degree requires
you to do here to graduate. And I see students go into tips and they’re looking for
the equivalent classes, and that’s fine. But just keep in mind that
curriculum that you have, you must fulfill all of
that in order to graduate out of Queensborough. so don’t lose focus on that. – [George] Yes. – [Student] Math 120, is
that counted as an elective or towards the. – [George] Towards the BT degree, 120 is counted as an elective. – [Student] Now I’ll be
taking 128 and 440 and 441. – Yes, 120 is the prereq for 440, yes. – [Man] 128. – [Student] How can I broaden my. – [Vicki] Did you say 128 or 120? – [Student] 128 and 440 and 441. – Why are you taking 128? I thought you were
taking 120, 440 and 441. – [Student] Well to go to Queens, we need to take 128, right? – [Vicki] Then don’t take 440 and 441. – [Student] But if I’m. – [Vicki] Oh, if you wanna go to Baruch? – [Student] Yeah, I don’t wanna. – Well, Queens will accept the 440, Queens will accept the 440. – [Student] Is that (speaking faintly). – That’s why I say any
school in the country will accept the 440 and the 441. – [Student] So I’m gonna have to take 128, if I have 440 on that too. – [Vicki] We recommend it,
but no you’re not on it. – Okay, two more questions, because, yes. – [Student] So. – You’re next. – [Student] For the 440, for Baruch, if you don’t do 440 here, you’ll go (speaking faintly) exactly, (speaking faintly). – If you don’t do well
at Baruch on that exam, yes you will have, if it
means you have to go back, you will go back. That’s why you study hard. Yes ma’am. – [Student] 128, I took
120, if I pass the exam, why (speaking faintly). – The question was, if
she takes and passes 120, does she have to take 128. What’s your curriculum? – [Student] Business Administration. – Business Administration? I would suggest that
you speak with someone, speak with one of us on. – [Vicki] I can answer that. – Because I wouldn’t, I
would not want her to, 128 is not gonna help her. – [Vicki] You definitely have to take an additional math course after 128, and it could be any of
Math 260, 261, 440 and 441, or math (speaking faintly). You have five choices. – [Woman] What would you say, you were 140 and to. – No, 440. – 440 and 441.
– Then you’re fine that’s it. That’s it, yeah, yes sir. – [Student] I know the Baruch
College required TOEFL exam for the students English
as second language, and if I graduate here, do I have to still take a exam? – No. That TOEFL exam is required if you’re going in as a freshman. Once you’ve completed
English 101 and 102 here, and you have your degree,
you are no longer required to take the TOEFL. That I know specifically because that question has come up
several times this semester. Yes. – [Student] (speaking
faintly) become a junior, for most of (speaking faintly) my classes (speaking faintly). – Yeah. – [Student] The person I talked to he told me that there’s a
transfer program for Baruch, but my major’s Accounting. What (speaking faintly). I am the transfer student, I think. – Yeah, Business Administration
is the transfer program for Finance and Accounting
at Baruch, the BT1. – [Student] What do you mean by that. – You’re going for the AS degree. Now the transfer program
for Accounting to Queens, that’s the BA2 program. That’s the only difference, okay? BA2 is a transfer specifically and solely to Queens College. You cannot take the BA2
and transfer it to Baruch. You can’t take the BA2 program, Business Accounting, and
transfer it to Hofstra. You can only transfer to Queens College and not lose any credits. You go to any other school in the country you will lose credits. – [Student] So like I told
you (speaking faintly). – So yours should be
Business Administration BT1, the transfer program. Once you get to Baruch, you will head into their Accounting Program and take their accounting courses. – [Student] So, what would
you say (speaking faintly) business to Baruch that
(speaking faintly). – That’s a personal preference. That’s a very, you have
to do the research. I can’t tell you which one is better over the other school. But I can tell you, I can tell you Queens has an excellent Accounting Program as does Baruch. So you have to look at each program and see what they require
for their graduates and how that’s going to suit you. Sit down with their Placement Director and see where they place their students, as you would if you went
to Hofstra or Adelphi. Speak with the Placement Director. See what type of schools or businesses they have recruiting on campus and that they send their
students to for jobs. That’s your ultimate goal, where you’re going to be employed. What type of lifestyle
you’re going to have. So you need to find out how
this is gonna work for you. All right? Not how it’s gonna work for your friend, how it’s gonna work for you. – [Vicki] I was just gonna say that, too. – Don’t depend on what
happened with your friend or your brother your sister. You’re an entirely different individual. So how this reflects on you, whether or not you’re
comfortable on that campus, that plays an important part as well. You may not like Queens
College’s atmosphere. You may love what’s going on at Baruch. Baruch is right there 23rd and Lex, near all the stores, that
may be your ideal campus. Whereas Queens College, Adelphi or Hofstra or Queensborough’s out here
in the middle of nowhere. (audience laughs) You may like that. But whatever makes you comfortable, that’s what you choose as your goal, okay? One last. – [Woman] We’re gonna
take one more question cause we really gotta wrap it up, it’s the three o’clock. – Yeah I got a walk-through
to do. (laughs) – [Woman] So just one more question. And if you wanna stay on that’s fine, talk to the representatives from Hofstra, because of the line, just one
more question, all right, go. – [Student] So if you
take 440 here and 441 and you want to transfer to Baruch, do you have to take the
placement test still? – No. – [Student] No, do you just
take (speaking faintly). – [Woman] I just wanna add one. – Your transcript will be
your placement results. – It varies every time. When I graduated from Queensborough, all I needed to take was Math 440. I didn’t have any more
math to take at Baruch, but it is better now, currently, if you could do both Math 440 and 441. So my advice is every student
has a different situation. Please don’t listen to your friends, get the correct information what you need. Okay and my second advice to you, those of you who are trying to deviate from taking a foreign language in business and I can tell you from
my personal experience, when you have that foreign
language asset under your belt, it looks good when you
go for that interview and that job, ’cause I’ve been asked, are you bilingual. So you kind of have the extra edge. So even though you want
the easy way out sometimes, it’s not always, it’s not
always good, okay, thank you. – I wanna thank all our speakers for taking the time. Let’s give a nice round
and hand of applause for making time to come and
give you valuable information.

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