Session 3: How to Write Social Media Posts Designed for Engagement

Session 3: How to Write Social Media Posts Designed for Engagement


Hey everybody. Happy Wednesday, Happy Thanksgiving week. Hope you all are doing well. And you are looking forward to a relaxing couple of days unless you’re in another country. And then sorry this is Thanksgiving week in the states where tomorrow we will all eat an extraordinary amount of food, and then just, I don’t know, watch football and not do anything else for the rest of the weekend. So today we are going to talk about how to create social posts that drive engagement and connection. Just want to say at the outset that if you have any questions at all, share them in the chat window, I think it’s going to be kind of a skeleton crew joining us today because it is right before the holiday. So we’ll keep this, you know fairly short, and fairly kind of concise because this is, this is a topic that I think a lot of people find confusing and it’s a critical part of how you kind of build your personal brand, expand your influence on social media and it’s something that I think a lot of people really struggle with and I know I did at first and I got some some really good advice early on and it changed everything for me. So we’re going to dig into how you actually write the copy of you know, the written part of your social content so that people don’t just look at it, but they actually engage with it. They add comments, they share their perspective and it starts an actual conversation and there’s a couple of things that you want to keep in mind. So one of the best pieces of advice I got on this is somebody actually compared writing this copy with you know, how you think about kind of marketing in terms of conversion rate optimization. I don’t mean to go kind of down a weird niche rabbit hole, but the big thing that we know in marketing is, you know, if you want somebody to do something on a website, on a landing page, in an email, you have to tell them what you want them to do. You can’t you can’t beat around the bush. You can’t be sort of vague and hope that they figure it out. You need to tell them exactly what you want to do. So my my number one piece of advice is actually put in your social post, especially if it’s on the LinkedIn, what you are asking your audience to do. Are you asking them a question? Are you asking them to share particular information? Are you asking them to tag a friend who can relate to whatever you’re talking about? Have them do something very specific because if you don’t ask for it, they simply won’t do it and people, even if they think your content is amazing, they’ll be a little more likely to hit like and keep moving and not to actually comment and engage so number one actually add a call to action, actually tell people Do what you want them to do. Number two, think about asking a question. Okay. So if you just share information often times people will comment on it particularly if it’s really helpful, but if if you just sort of share a little nugget about something helpful or something valuable people will be a little more likely to just “like” and keep going, they won’t necessarily add a comment or engage with what you’re saying. So again and this is similar to kind of point number one. Think about asking a question of your audience in some capacity. Number two or number three, excuse me. Do not put it all in one big block of text. When people read one big block of text, they simply keep going. I don’t know if you have this reaction. I know that I do personally when I see a big block of text and it doesn’t even have to be that big if it’s like four lines with no brakes. My my eyes start to water, I don’t pay attention. I don’t I don’t engage with it. I just ignore it and I move on. So make sure you break it up, and it doesn’t have to be one line one one one nine one one one line. It can be, you know a little bit more varied than that. And I think that that’s really the most helpful but you want to have it so that it’s very easy to read and almost think about it like like how you how you talk so that it’s almost in a more conversational and kind of more informal tone. Social media, I think you need to approach the content that you’re writing very differently from how you approach writing a blog post or writing an email, right? You want it to feel much more conversational, much more personal, much more informal, and that’s something that it makes it much easier to read. So you think about it. Most of the people are going to be like, I don’t know on their morning commute. Hopefully not driving. Maybe on the train or they’re sitting in waiting in line somewhere and they’re going to be scrolling on their phone – when it’s a big block of text, a big block of text that shows up on your desktop, as a block of text on your phone it’s like, nobody wants to read that. So make sure it’s broken up and make sure it feels casual conversational almost like somebody is having like an in-person conversation with you. Okay, and that kind of brings me to my next point because it’s along these lines. If you look on social media the things that perform the best, far and away, are personal. They say something personal about that person’s kind of perspective on things about something that they’ve experienced or gone through something that matters to them. You need to figure out how you bring in your own personality and your own kind of voice and your own tone into what you write. And this might be the most challenging especially for those those of you that find this very nerve-wracking. It can be tempting to to appear as though you know, appear as though you’ve got expertise and wisdom and knowledge in these things and that’s great and that’s important, but people want to see you and so, you know, like I I saw a post this morning from Scott Leese o,f I mean, it’s sort of a faux gratitude post but it’s him, you know thinking of all the people that doubted him because that’s what pushed him on to do better things. It’s very personal and it’s very fiery and fired up and no big shocker there it got tons of comments and tons of engagement so I know it can seem a little scary, but you want to think about how you can create content that really represents you as a person and your unique perspective, right? Like no one can be you better than you can. Sorry, there’s a really adorable dog walking past my desk, but no one can be you better than you can so figure out what is really unique to your voice. I mean, I think I’ve said on some of the other webinars that we’ve done in this series, my first video that I had that really went viral, it was me being super fired up. It was me being really passionate about something and it was me sharing my love and appreciation for sales development reps who I feel like get the short shift all the time, and it was very me. It was very, it was me ranting very much in my personal ranting style. And I think that’s why it did well is because it was me being passionate and engaged and so you want to think about how you can create content that really captures people and that really gets them excited and don’t overthink it, right? The more you overthink it, the more you plan it, the less sort of authentic and personal it’s going to come across. So you want to get in that mode of sort of being off the cuff, you know, I joke often that some of the, one of the best ways that you can write some of this content is after like one or two glasses of wine because you’re loose enough where you’re going to be just like a little bit bolder than you ordinarily would be, but not so loopy that you’re going to say something inappropriate or do something inappropriate and so you obviously don’t need to do that. I’m not encouraging all of you to kind of to drink, just to do social media content, but do you think about the headspace at that puts you in? Okay, think about how you feel when you’re confident, when you’re a little loose, when you’re like a little bold, what puts you in that mode? And what are the things that you wind up saying to people? How do you express yourself? Think about how you can kind of approach your personal brand building and your social media content from that perspective right of being confident having a little swagger and being very, very you. So let’s do a quick recap. Number one tell your audience what you want them to do. You want them to engage, you want them to answer. Two, what was number two? Oh, think about asking your audience a question. I’m totally forgetting the order of everything that I put, so, whatever you get all of these things. The one last thing that I’m going to include in all of this is that you need to – no blocks of text! See, Dan is saving me here. No blocks of text. Exactly. And then the other thing is that you want to make it personal, right? And those are kind of the big ones. The very last thing that I want to mention because I think this is also really critical is you have to actually respond to the people that respond to you. Okay, I see this all the time and I especially see this from people that have really like nailed it on one platform and then they start doing it on another – they’ll start putting content out there and they don’t actually go on that platform and they don’t actually engage so I see this regularly. I’m not going to name names but there’s somebody that I deeply respect. I think has great content on LinkedIn and really engages with his audience on LinkedIn and I’m assuming that someone on his team is just like copying stuff that he says on LinkedIn and putting it on Twitter and they just put it out and they don’t engage at all. And so they get no engagement. They get no likes, they get like one or two, and it’s not really a conversation. This whole thing is about starting a conversation and making it very personal and really connecting with others. And that means that when someone comments on your post, you’ve gotta comment on their comment. Engage with them, ask them follow-up questions, ask them more about their perspective, learn from this audience. That is how you’re going to get the most value out of it. And here’s the deal. That’s also how you’re going to build actual connections, like real relationships, you know, real connections that actually can take you to other collaborations or projects or things you can work on with these people. That’s what, what, you know transforms you from having a good social media feed to having a good network, and that’s what this is all really about. It’s not about how many likes you get. It’s not about how many views you get. It’s about, what does this do for you in your career? And what does this do for your ability to have an impact on your industry and on the people around you? And the only way this is going to translate to something that is, is, is demonstrable, truly valuable, is if you are using this as a way to build relationships. So what I think about with marketing and what I think about with kind of personal brand building is that this is relationship building but at scale and so, you know, it’s through the stuff that I’ve done, like videos I’ve done on LinkedIn and the conversations that have resulted that I now have multiple close lifelong friends that have arisen from this and I wouldn’t have that if there wasn’t the actual engagement and the willingness to take things sometimes offline, sometimes to direct messages, sometimes to the phone, like you name it but make sure this is about building connection and building relationships. Not just about building your brand. Okay, Dan again. Thank you for your help. Are there any questions before we wrap up and we head into Thanksgiving weekend. Nope. Okay. So have a very Happy Thanksgiving, a great thing that you can share on social media. Today is all of the things that you are grateful for. We would all love to see it. We all benefit from hearing about one another’s gratitude. Okay. Have a great weekend, and hopefully I will see you next week.

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