Lord of the Rings: Fate of the Fellowship (Sponsored by Lootcrate)

Lord of the Rings: Fate of the Fellowship (Sponsored by Lootcrate)


After the defeat of the Dark Lord Sauron in
the War of the Last Alliance, the One Ring of power was kept by Isildur King of Gondor,
who was killed in an Orc attack the next year. Lost in the Anduin River for over 2000 years,
the ring eventually came into the possession of Bilbo Baggins, a hobbit of the Shire who
had no notion whatsoever as to its origins. Forged to obey only Sauron, the One Ring wrought
obsession in the lives of those who held it, and destroyed the lives of three others before
it came to Bilbo, yet somehow the hobbit was largely able to resist its unnatural allure. Though he did grow attached to the ring after
many years and was tempted to take it with him when he departed to live with the Elves,
in the end he was able to voluntarily pass it on to his nephew Frodo Baggins, along with
his house and other possessions. Yet in time, Sauron learned of the ring’s
location, forcing Gandalf to send Frodo on a journey east, so he might attend a Council
in Rivendell. Joined by 3 hobbit companions, Frodo left
the Shire and survived the difficult journey, though he suffered grievous wound at the hands
of the witch king of angmar, who sought the ring on Sauron’s behalf. During the Council of Elrond, it was decided
that one of them must travel to Mordor and destroy the One Ring in the fires of mount
doom. Bilbo was a worthy candidate but he was too
old, and so the task fell to Frodo who like his uncle had proven able to resist corruption. To help and defend him a company was formed,
with nine walkers selected to contrast the nine riders of the Nazgul. The Fellowship of the Ring, as it became known,
included the ringbearer Frodo Baggins, the Wizard Gandalf the Grey, the heir to the throne
of Gondor Aragorn to represent men, Legolas heir to the Woodland Realm to represent elves,
and Gimli son of Gloin to represent the Dwarves of Durin’s Folk. Boromir was selected as a valiant warrior
and representative of Gondor, while the rest of the positions went to Frodo’s hobbit
companions, Samwise Gamgee, Meriadoc Brandybuck and Peregrin Took, who refused to be left
behind. Sharing dangers and bonding over the course
of their journey, the members of the Fellowship forged a strong connection to each other. Yet despite their best intentions the journey
was harrowing and the fellowship eventually broke apart after Gandalf was lost in Moria,
and Boromir fell to temptation, trying to take the ring for himself. The eldest son and heir of Denethor the Steward
of Gondor, Boromir was a seasoned warrior and experienced commander who along with his
brother Faramir, had a dream about the One Ring, though they did not understand it at
the time. Boromir then travelled to Rivendell where
he attended the Council of Elrond and learned about Frodo and the ring, suggesting that
it be given to Gondor, who were on the front lines of the war with Sauron, so it could
be used as a weapon against the enemy. When it was decided that the ring was too
dangerous to be wielded and must instead be destroyed, Boromir tried to set aside his
misgivings and joined the Fellowship, but inside continued to believe the mission was
a mistake. Though he was genuine in his desire to help
the group and fought bravely to defend them throughout the journey, he ultimately surrendered
to a moment of weakness, and tried to forcibly take the ring from Frodo. Fortunately, the hobbit was able to evade
him, leaving Boromir to recover his control and regret his actions. He then died defending Merry and Pippin from
an unexpected Uruk-hai attack at Amon Hen, afterwhich his brother Faramir became heir
to the Stewardship of Gondor, and commander of their armies in the war of the Ring. As for the rest of the fellowship, Boromir’s
momentary betrayal and the ensuing battle with Uruk-hai resulted in their separation. Though the surviving members of the fellowship
went on to suffer many hardships, witnessing death and destruction on a terrifying scale,
each of them continued to play an important role in the ultimate defeat of the dark lord,
including Gandalf the White who was reborn after his death facing the balrog of Moria. A Maia of Valinor, Gandalf was among 5 Istari
who were selected to travel to middle earth and help the population defeat Sauron, and
so when he died, Eru the creator sent him back to complete his task. After Frodo and Sam destroyed the One Ring
of power, and Sauron was defeated, the fellowship reunited in Minas Tirith, where Sam, Merry,
Pippin, Legolas and Gimli were in attendance to watch Frodo and Gandalf participate in
the coronation of Aragorn, as King Elessar of the Reunited Kingdom of Gondor and Arnor. Having survived the horrors of the War of
the Ring, Elessar was eager be among friends, and so the fellowship remained together for
a time in Minas Tirith. During their stay, the hobbits were named
Princes of the realm, and Frodo was given a white gem upon a silver chain by Queen Arwen
as well as her seat on an elven ship sailing west to the paradise of the Undying Lands,
as she was staying behind to live a mortal life with her husband Aragorn. When it was at last time to move on from Gondor,
the Fellowship rode north, where they witnessed the coronation of Eomer as King of Rohan. While guests of the Horse Lords, Meriadoc
Brandybuck was honored by the King and the princess Eowyn, for his service to Theoden
during the war, and was gifted a silver horn forged by the Dwarves and recovered from the
Dragon Scatha the Worm, who was defeated by an ancestor of their family. Though they soon departed the King’s hall,
the fellowship spent more time in Rohan, with Gimli and Legolas touring the Glittering caves,
before they all stopped at Isengard to check on Treebeard and the Ents. Then at last the Fellowship separated, with
Elessar reminding Peregrin Took, who pledged his service to Denethor during the war, that
he was still a Knight of Gondor, and that one day the King would reclaim the northern
half of his realm. Elessar then returned south, while Legolas
and Gimli went to explore Fangorn forest before making their way North to their homes in Mirkwood
and Erebor. Continuing on to the Shire, the hobbits rode
alongside Gandalf, stopping near Lorien to bid farwell to Galadriel and Celeborn, before
heading to Rivendell where they spent two weeks with Frodo’s uncle Bilbo Baggins. Before departing Old Bilbo gave each of the
hobbits a gift, with Merry and Pippin given smoking pipes made by the elves, while Frodo
received a stack of books translated from Elvish, and Sam was given a pouch, containing
gold recovered from the Dragon Smaug the terrible. The hobbits and Gandalf then travelled to
Bree, where Sam was reunited with Bill the Pony, and Frodo told his story to the townsfolk
who asked him to write book about his adventures. They then departed Bree together, but Gandalf
soon left them so he might visit his old friend Tom Bombadil who lived nearby. Unfortunately as the hobbits neared the Shire,
they started to hear rumours of trouble and could no longer rely on Gandalf to help them,
as his mission was over and he would no longer interfere in the affairs of Middle Earth. But the four hobbits were now experienced
warriors who’d faced countless adversities during the War of the Ring, and were confident
in their ability to deal with whatever awaited them. Quickly they saw that this was not the Shire
they remembered, encounteing a closed gate on the road before being refused entrance
into their own homeland. Forced to make threats in order to be allowed
through, the hobbits soon learned of a Boss named Sharkey and his gang of ruffians who
had taken charge of the region, creating harsh new rules that among other things, restricted
access to beer, food and pipe weed. As the hobbits travelled to Bag End, they
were confronted by some of these Ruffians who insulted Frodo and mocked their claim
that a new king sat in the white city. After hearing his words, Pippin, who was a
sworn knight of Gondor, was outraged and drew his sword, hastily backed up by Sam and Merry
also took out their weapons, intimidating the ruffians into retreating. Merry and Sam then rallied together their
people to form a militia, and started to make war plans while Pippin led a group to Tooklands,
where they had resisted the Ruffians, bringing back a hundred more warriors. The Captains Merry and Pippin then led their
forces to victory in the battle of the bywater, resulting in the death of nearly seventy ruffians
and 19 hobbits. Frodo and his companions then went to Bag
End where they learned that Sharkey was in fact Saruman the White, a mighty wizard of
Valinor who’d betrayed the free peoples and fallen so low he sought petty revenge
against the hobbits of the Shire. Yet even after causing so much harm, Frodo
insisted that he be sparred, wanting no more blood be shed. But it was not be, as Saruman’s servant
Grima Wormtongue then attacked and killed his master, before the hobbits slew him as
well. Frodo then freed Sharkey’s prisoners and
served as Deputy Mayor for a time, working to help restore the Shire to its former glory. Living in Bag End, Frodo wrote about his adventures
in the Red Book of Westmarch, before leaving middle earth to join Gandalf, and Bilbo as
they voyaged west to live in the Undying lands. Bag End, the Red Book and all his other belongings
were left to Samwise Gamgee, who married Rosie Cotton and had 13 children, naming 4 of his
boys after Frodo, Merry, Pippin and Bilbo. Sam went on to serve seven terms as Mayor
of Michel Delving, and created a family dynasty of great importance to these lands, who eventually
changed their last name to Gardener, to reflect their contribution to the restoration of the
Shire. After the death of his wife Rosie in the year
61of the 4th age, Sam, who had briefly become a ringbearer during the war against Sauron,
left the Shire and according to family legend, journeyed to the Grey Havens, where he was
allowed passage into the Undying Lands of the West, so he might be reunited with his
old friend Frodo. Meriadoc Brandybuck, went on to marry Estella
Bolger, and became head of his family as Master of Buckland. Earning the nickname Merry the Magnificent,
he authored a number of works including, Herblore of the Shire, The Reckoning of Years, and
Old Words and Names in the Shire. Peregrin Took married Diamond of Long Cleeve,
fathering a son they named Faramir, and held the important office of Thain, where he became
Master of the Shire-moot and captain of the Shire-muster and Hobbitry-in-arms
In addition to becoming leaders in their community, when King Elessar began expanding his realm
to reclaim the lands of Arnor, Samwise, Merry and Pippin, were named Counsellors of the
North-kingdom. After raising families and living for decades
in the Shire, Merry and Pippin eventually retired in the year 63 of the Fourth Age,
leaving their positions of Influence to travel south at the request of King Eomer of Rohan. After the passing of their old friend, the
hobbits journeyed to Gondor where they stayed with the King until their deaths. Yet Merry and Pippin were so valued and honoured
that when Elessar died in the year 120, their bodies were laid to rest at his side. The ruler of Gondor and Arnor, who was once
known as Aragorn, lived a long and storied life, marrying the elf maiden Arwen, daughter
of Elrond, and together had a number of children, the first being Eldarion, heir to the throne. King Elessar ruled for 122 years, able to
live far longer than most of his kind due to his ancestry which included the blood of
Numenor and a number of ancient heroes of both elven and human nobility. Among the many gifts and honors he bestowed,
Faramir, Steward of Gondor, was given the Lordship of Emyn Arnen and title Prince of
Ithilien. The Oath of Eorl was also officially restored
with King Eomer of Rohan, confirming their friendship and alliance. After forging a lasting peace with their neighbour,
Elessar was determined to restore the glory of both Gondor and the lost kingdom of Arnor,
while also dealing with the remnants of Sauron’s armies, fighting and defeating those Easterling
and Haradrim factions who remained hostile to his realm. Throughout his reign he accomplished much,
including the opening and exploration of Orthanc, Saruman’s ancient tower, brimming with secrets
and treasures. Bringing the area into his domain, Elessar
gifted the land to the Ents who founded the Treegarth of Orthanc, where they were allowed
to govern their own affairs. The Drúadan Forest was given to the Druidain,
a mysterious but kind hearted people who suffered much persecution throughout the years and
helped the alliance during the war of the Ring. Ever grateful towards the hobbits of the Fellowship,
the King was generous with the Shire when he travelled north to re-establish the kingdom
of Arnor, expanding their territory to include the westmarch, allowing them self-governance
and restricting outside access to the region out of respect for their isolationist ways. When the King at last died in the year 120
of the fourth age, the throne passed to his son Eldarion, while his wife Arwen did not
wish to go on without her husband and gave up her life the following year. In the North, after returning to Erebor, the
elf-friend Gimli organized an expedition and travelled once more to the Glittering Caves,
where he became Lord of a new settlement whose craftsmen gained renowned throughout Gondor
and Rohan, even constructing a new gate for Minas Tirith, forged of mithril and steel. Legolas, Gimli’s closest friend had similar
notions to that of the dwarf, and returned home of the Woodland Realm, only to leave
once more with a party of followers, founding a new settlement in Ithillien which became
the fairest country in all the westlands. After the death of their friend King Elessar,
both Legolas and Gimli decided to leave middle-earth and sail west to the undying lands of Aman,
where they might be reunited with Gandalf, Frodo and Sam. Though a mortal being who was not a ringbearer
would not normally be allowed passage west, some say Gimli was permitted because of his
deep bond of friendship with Legolas, which was stronger than any that ever existed between
dwarves and elves. However others say that it was his affection
for the lady Galadrial, which convinced her to speak on his behalf to the Valar of Aman.

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