Community Connectors in Data Studio (DataVis DevTalk: S01)

Community Connectors in Data Studio (DataVis DevTalk: S01)


MINHAZ KAZI: Welcome
to DataVis DevTalk. I’m your host, Minhaz
Kazi, developer advocate for Data Studio. In this video, we’ll talk
about community connectors and how you can use them to
fetch your data in Data Studio. Let’s get started. Data Studio helps you
to organize, access, and understand your information. Although different
individuals and businesses have different
needs, it is often useful to have a comprehensive
view of their data. You might have data
from different sources, social media, analytics,
advertising, et cetera. You might also have
organizational data, including sales, finance,
and human resource. Your data can be hosted and
available in different places. You might have
on-premise private data. For example, you might
have marketing information on a MySQL server on
your corporate network. You can have private
data on the cloud. Maybe you’re using Firebase
database for your application. You can also be using data
from commercial platforms like Google Analytics
and Google Ads. Another interesting use case
is using public data sets. A prime example of that is
the BigQuery public data set which is available
for everyone to use. If you want to analyze
and visualize your data you’ll need to connect to
your data in Data Studio, and that’s where
connectors come in. Data Studio provides a
number of connectors for you to connect to your own data. You can connect to
a GCP data source like Sheets, BigQuery,
Cloud SQL, Cloud Storage, and Cloud Spanner. You can connect to
different Google services like Google Analytics,
Google Ads, Search Console, YouTube Analytics,
Attribution 360, and more. There are also connectors
available to connect to your own instances
of MySQL and PostgreSQL. But what if your data is
not in any of these sources and is in somewhere else? Well, in that case, you can
use community connectors. Community connectors
are custom connectors that you can create
using Apps Script. Apps Script is Google’s
scripting language. It is a JavaScript
platform on the cloud. You can access it by going
to script.google.com. Apps Script lets you
do more with Google. Using it, you can
increase the power of all these Google
applications by using their API and also by building
custom add-ons. So when you create your
own custom connector using Apps Script,
you can fetch data from almost any
internet-accessible data source. You can use web API endpoints,
flash files like CSV, JSON, XML, databases with
JDBC APIs, and also many Apps Script services. In this video
series, we will show you step by step how you can
build your own connector. Once you’ve built a
community connector, you can obviously
use it yourself to bring in your own
data into Data Studio. Now your co-worker sees
you using that connector but thinks that it will
be useful for them. They don’t have to build
it from scratch again. You can just share your
connector with specific users. After a certain time, several
people in your organization start using your connector,
and it gets really popular. You can make it
securely available within your organization. That way, anyone in the
organization can use it, but the access and the
data remain secure. You can also make your
connector available to everyone. And one of the
ways you can do it is by publishing it to the
Data Studio Partner Connector Gallery. There are more than 100
connectors available that connect to over
500 data sources. You can try out these partner
connectors by visiting the gallery at
datastudio.google.com/data. So that was an overview
of community connectors. In our next video, we
will talk about how community connectors work. You can always go to
our developer site at
developers.google.com/datastudio for more information. If you enjoyed this
video, like and subscribe to the GCB channel for
more videos like this. Thanks for watching.

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