Biotechnology, Medicine and Your Life Expectancy

Biotechnology, Medicine and Your Life Expectancy


in this video we explore medicine and neuroscience you’ll see why you’re likely to live not just to your 80s or 90s but to age 110 or 120 and why you’ll be healthier and feel younger at age 95 then at age 55 so let’s get started let’s talk about medicine and neuroscience Time magazine’s had us take a look at this baby projecting Wow 142 years old maybe Bloomberg Businessweek asked if we’re inventing a forever pill wondering if everybody’s gonna live 100 200 300 years old I want you to meet this venture capitalist Dimitri Kaminsky he’s offering a million dollars to the first person to make it to age 123 this is me and him at a technology conference a couple of years ago more importantly I want you to meet Nola Ox she got her college degree at age 95 Ruth Flowers was a professional DJ at age 82 Armin Gendreau skydiving at age 101 Johanna Glass a gymnast at age 87 and here’s Ed Saerelon he filed an age discrimination lawsuit he was head coach of the men’s and women’s cross country and track and field teams they fired him he filed suit for age discrimination at the age of 88 how about Don Pellman set five World Records in the Senior Olympics at age 100 you know watching these videos is uh it’s exciting and you see these folks that doing remarkable things at remarkable ages but still when I talk with folks about aging and how chances are you’re not going to die in your 80s and 90s you’re probably gonna die at a hundred ten hundred twenty that kind of freaks a lot of people a lot of people out a lot of folks they even object when we do tell them they’re gonna live to age ninety five I mean actuarial II the IRS says you’re gonna live to 88 the American Society of Actuaries says you’re gonna live to 88 that’s today well if they’re saying you’re gonna live to age 88 today guess what happens when you reach age 88 obviously you’re gonna live longer than that people often reject that because they’re like I don’t want to live that long and the reason people say that is because of this image that’s whistlers mother of course she was 67 years old when Whistler painted his mother’s portrait and this is the image that many people have of old age they don’t want to live into their old age I mean they don’t want to be sitting in a wheel chair staring out a window drooling what’s the point of living that long right I mean what who wants to spend their last years in a nursing home suffering from dementia well what you have to understand is that due to the innovations that are coming in medicine and neuroscience this image is not what your future is likely to be instead it’s more likely to be this one this is Sophia Loren aged 72 when this photograph was taken this is what the future is more likely to be yours we are aging better than ever between improvements in health care nutrition exercise we are healthier longer than ever before and it’s just going to continue scientists are recognizing that life expectancies are continuing to grow a thousand years ago the average human lived only 19 years this is why women were having kids at age 13 14 15 because they were dead at 19 that was in the year 1 thousand if we go back just a hundred years life expectancy advanced to age 47 it’s hard to remember that at 1900 the average American died at age 47 today life expectancy is about age 89 and at the moment we are adding about one month a year to our life expectancy which means every year you live you can expect to be adding a month to your life expectancy but by 2036 scientists say that we’ll be adding a year for every year we live in other words the most common causes of death in the 2040s are likely to be accidents and stupidity what’s driving all this biotechnology we’re taking technological products and developing them out of living organisms and inserting them into living organisms we’re talking about synthetic biology scientists have begun to realize that DNA itself is software and because of that it’s a code and we can rearrange that code in a specific order this is how scientists were able to create the glow-in-the-dark cat that you saw in our very first video by changing the DNA we can change the anatomy and the biology now the cost of doing all this has been dropping dramatically first we had to begin by sequencing the human genome you can’t change it until you first understand it and can sequence it the very first effort was done in 1990 it took it was said to take 15 years and six billion dollars in fact it only took seven years and 2.7 billion but still sequencing a human genome for 2.7 billion dollars that’s not something everybody on the Block is going to go out and do by 2000 the cost dropped to a hundred million by 2010 31,000 by 2015 twelve hundred bucks by 2020 the cost of sequencing the human genome will be a penny it’ll be cheaper than flushing the toilet we have to recognize the incredible improvements that are coming it’s allowing us to invent artificial skin that works and acts like human skin by 2020 its projected there won’t be any more cancers like breast cancer or lung cancer that’s not what we’re going to call them they’re gonna be renamed for their genomes like the bracket1 gene already being described for breast cancer a lot of this as a result of a new technology called the CRISPR caste 9 this was developed in 2015 widely regarded as one of the most important breakthroughs in medicine in generations what does this do it allows scientists to edit the human DNA as easily as you can cut and paste in a Word document we can add missing genes we can remove bad genes to improve your health dramatically look at this kid 14 years old Jay created a cancer test for pancreatic cancer that is 400 times more sensitive than current tests a hundred and 26 times faster to twenty six thousand times cheaper it only costs three cents this is a 14-year old doing this because the technologies are so cheap so accessible so easy kids can do it at the National Institutes of Health they’ve approved a technology using the CRISPR technology as a cancer treatment it’s being able to be used for autism for bipolar disorder for cancers of all types take a look at Nick Volker this is the first child ever saved by DNA sequencing every disease is a rare disease and by having our personal DNA mapped out we can adjust for all of them in other words we’re talking about nano robots we’ve talked about nanotechnology earlier imagine a clamshell that opens when it finds a cancer cell grabs onto it and holds it so the cancer cell can’t grow regenerative medicine stem cells that replace other cells that have been damaged by age or disease or trauma what scientists are beginning to realize is that aging itself is a disease it’s not an inherent part of life and if we can recognize that we can manipulate our DNA to stop and even reverse aging scientists in Japan are already doing this with mice they’ve already figured out how to take the memories of one mouse and move them into another mouse how long will it be before this technology is used on humans the bio Hackett lab makes biotech accessible to everyone it’s affordable and it’s open on the Internet if you look at Autodesk they’ve created a virus construction kit this came out in 2010 Autodesk offers a synthetic biology interface that lets high-school students program their DNA high school students by 2030 drug development will become high school science projects at the Los Alamos National Laboratory they’re producing software that identifies virus DNA within hours 250,000 times faster than prior methods how about the mChip cuts HIV testing from weeks down to mere 15 minutes instead of an entire vial of blood it just needs a drop you know we’re not just sequencing the human genome we’re doing it with plants as well in 2000 it took seven years and 70 million dollars to sequence the first plant now it takes three minutes and a hundred bucks as a result of this we’re able to take yeast modify them to make biofuels in Florida they’ve released genetically modified mosquitoes that are designed with DNA to combat dengue fever and chikungunya 70 million of these mosquitoes were released in the Cayman Islands Malaysia Brazil Panama and also now in Florida up to 90 percent effective a Saudi engineer has created a biotech solution to clean up oil spills on either land or in water it’s made vegetables it not only cleans oil spills you can use it to clean utensils and floors we’re able to alter crops so they can resist disease they need less water they can produce higher yields a couple of years ago the FDA approved the Arctic Apple this is the first Apple that when you slice it open it doesn’t Brown after several days we’ve been genetically modifying seeds for 30 years there’s nothing new about this 92% of all the cotton in the United States is genetically engineered 94% of all the corn 94% of all the soybeans more than a trillion genetically engineered meals have been served globally not one instance of induced illness seeds do not require ploughing no soil erosion they cut herbicide use they increase crop yields we can feed more people per acre of farming and check this out eventually one cow is going to feed the entire world how on earth is that going to happen in vitro meat that has grown from stem cells in a laboratory meat that’s grown in a bioreactor tank it’s less vulnerable to disease and contamination who’s doing the funding who on earth would pay for this PETA why because they see it as the end of animal cruelty we don’t have to grow and raise millions of cows and sheep and chickens if we can do this in a laboratory the first test-tube grown hamburger was produced in the Netherlands in 2015 in 2013 it cost $400,000 the current cost is about 250,000 it’s projected that you’ll be ordering them from your fest food joint by the mid-2020s and then there’s other technology coming in the field of Medicine take a look at this video Les had lost both limbs in a freak electrical accident over 40 years ago and is excited to become the first shoulder level amputee to have the MPL fully and wirelessly integrated into his body on this day Les is being fitted for his socket which is sort of a body brace that makes the neural connections with the renovated nerves as well as supports the prosthetic limbs the first cast they did on me for the test socket was all done with electronics they took like oh I don’t know like a scanner and you started walking around my body and they just painted on the screen and boom they sent it off I get out here it fits well the socket got its finishing touches the team took the next step and had less work with the virtual reality system that mimics the actual prosthetic arms a couple days later the socket was back and the arms were attached Les and the team were about to make history once the training sessions were complete and they released me and let me be the computer basically to control that arm I just go into a whole different world I think we’re just getting started at this point it’s like the early days of the internet there’s just a tremendous amount of potential ahead of us and we just started down this road I think the next five 10 years are gonna bring some really phenomenal advancements other milestones reached by the team were this was the first time the mpls were operated by a shorter level amputee at the full three degrees of freedom and with over 30 total degrees of motion on both sides with complete intuitive thought based control he has access to all of the different degrees of motion shoulder elbow wrist hand but he still needs to select which one he wants to use so he needs to position the shoulder then the elbow then the wrist then the hand separately and rest in between maybe I’ll be able to for one to be able to put changing apart machine and get the pop out of it simple things like that but most people never think of and and it’s realtor me we’d really like to be able to do is send him with a couple of limbs so that you know he can use them in his everyday life and what this showed us is that that’s really possible all of us on this RP 2019 regardless of the type of patient we’re fitting are committed to making every effort to see that this ultimately reaches the end user in a way that they can actually utilize it it’s not just the accomplishment but the opening of frontiers and realizing that there’s so much more to learn this unique opportunity of interfacing with the end user utilizing our technology provides valuable feedback to the team feedback that will assist this started developed technology in helping wounded warriors and others to regain the 27 degrees of freedom possessed by the human arm of course if we can if we can provide Bionic parts for humans do we have to stop at simply replacing the human parts or can we create better parts than what the human body has been able to produce you remember the TV show don’t you gentlemen we can rebuild him we have the technology we have the capability to make the world’s first Bionic man you probably are familiar with Amy Purdy who lost both of her legs at a young age above the knee one of the most famous athletes and a star on Dancing with the Stars as well one of the problems we have with medical technology is physician information overload there is now so much knowledge so much content so many new studies coming out on a regular basis doctors are finding it hard to keep up Watson to the rescue Watson has the ability to read 200 million pages within milliseconds and that’s why Watson which got its medical degree from Sloan-Kettering is now at MD Anderson and other hospitals around the world helping to match patients with the proper clinical trials Watson is using its diagnostic skills to help doctors determine the best treatment plan for patients by 2020 Watson will be in your smartphone Star Trek’s tricorder will in fact be real medicine is in fact becoming p4 personalized predictive preventive and participatory the biggest boom in medicine cosmetic surgery in 2014 there were eight million procedures in the United States that’s twice as many as in the year 2000 52 percent of American adults are considering aesthetic treatments and is across wide swaths of the American population cosmetic procedures are up 38% for Caucasians 72% for African Americans 77% for Hispanic Americans 146 % for Asian Americans in South Korea one in five women have had cosmetic surgery Iranian women lead the world in rhinoplasty I guess that’s not a really big shock it’s the only body parts they’re allowed to display publicly in Brazil cosmetic surgery is tax-deductible the website RealSelf has had has 50 million visitors a year offering you a wide variety of body adjustments for your body your face and skin even your smile or people vain are people crazy to be wanting to alter their bodies voluntarily undergo surgical procedures just to change their appearance I’m not so sure people are crazy or not one study shows that people with above-average looks earn 230 thousand dollars more over the course of their careers than people with below average looks maybe the ordinary everyday person is aware of that social bias and what’s coming next designer babies at a major fertility clinic in California 20% of the couples who are obtaining IVF and PGD procedures are not doing so because they’re having trouble conceiving they’re doing it because they want to change the sex of their baby they specifically want a boy or a girl and these procedures allow them to choose the sex of their baby now you might be saying to yourself I don’t think I would ever do that are you so sure and is it going to stop there because if we can determine the sex of our child how long will it be before we’re able to determine the IQ of our child the height and weight the left or right handed miss the hair color their athletic ability and if you’re unwilling to engage in those modifications at the embryo stage well let me ask you this have you ever provided a tutor to help your child do better on the SAT to have your child be more competitive in college entrance exams many parents will do whatever it takes to give their children an advantage how far will we take this as a society and how soon are these technologies going to allow us to do exactly that what are the personal finance implications for all of this well careers retirement leisure none of them are going to be the same in the future you might need to make major changes to your financial plan as a result because what we’re discovering is The Truth About Your Future that’s it for this video in our next video we explore energy and the environment you’ll see why fossil fuels or history and how we’ll provide clean energy and water for the entire planet and how will clean up the toxic waste we’ve accumulated as well this series is based on my New York Times bestseller The Truth About Your Future the money guide you need now later and much later if at any point you have any questions you can send them to me by visiting the TheTruthAboutYourFuture.com thanks for watching

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